how many wires to one plug

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JasonS
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Joined: Sat Jul 23, 2016 5:21 pm

how many wires to one plug

Post by JasonS » Fri Jul 14, 2017 10:51 am

on the plug i bought there is the 4 screws for wires and then there is quick connects on the back of the plug. Can you utilize all the spots on the recptical? so power coming in on the screws and going out on the screws to the next box and another going out off the quick connects on the back to power another plug? so 3 romex to one box.

thanks

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Aaron
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Re: how many wires to one plug

Post by Aaron » Fri Jul 14, 2017 11:36 am

JasonS wrote:on the plug i bought there is the 4 screws for wires and then there is quick connects on the back of the plug. Can you utilize all the spots on the recptical? so power coming in on the screws and going out on the screws to the next box and another going out off the quick connects on the back to power another plug? so 3 romex to one box.
You have a choice to use either the screw terminals, or the backstab "push-in" connectors. You should not use both, because the device is not rated to splice more than two conductors per pole. You can therefore use one or two screws, OR one or two backstab connectors for each pole. You should be consistent for both poles, whatever termination method you decide to use. If you do go with the backstabs, be sure to screw down the terminal screws.

Having said that, I really discourage the use of the backstab connectors, I think they should be delisted by UL and CSA. The way they work is a piece of thin copper tab inside basically scrapes the wire on the side at an acute angle, and prevents it from being pulled out. Only the edge of this tab is touching the conductor, and over time the connection is prone to become slightly loose and build up a resistance than can cause arcs and overheating.

Use the screws instead. They make a very secure connection. When you shape the hook of the wire to go under the screw, be sure it's wrapping around the screw clockwise so as you tighten the screw, the screw head will twist the conductor inward.

Now you can use both screws to make a splice, but it's preferable to use a pigtail for a better electrical connection that doesn't rely on the receptacle to be the splice.

Alternatively (this is my favorite option) purchase a higher-quality spec-grade receptacle. They cost about $3.00, and they have backwire connections. This eliminates the need for any pigtails at all, and are as easy to use as backstabbing without the issues of safety, and you can put two wires under a screw terminal, and therefore four wires can terminate on one pole. Today, these are the only receptacles and switches that I buy!

JasonS
Posts: 11
Joined: Sat Jul 23, 2016 5:21 pm

Re: how many wires to one plug

Post by JasonS » Fri Jul 14, 2017 12:32 pm

thanks for your response.is this what you mean by splicing with the screws?
i added a pic i found. also just wondering about the higher-quality spec-grade receptacle you talked about would you have a link to that item so i could ask my local build supplie store.

thanks
FH01NOV_OUTLET_05.jpg
FH01NOV_OUTLET_05.jpg (12.39 KiB) Viewed 79 times

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Aaron
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Location: St. Paul, MN

Re: how many wires to one plug

Post by Aaron » Fri Jul 14, 2017 1:08 pm

That's a pigtail splice. Pigtails are short pieces of wire that goes from a splice (in that picture it's a splice using a wirenut or marette) to the device.

The receptacle that I use can make that same splice internally with one terminal screw:
IMG_5943.JPG
IMG_5943.JPG (72.7 KiB) Viewed 75 times
These are called "backwire" connections, and they should have been in receptacles and switches since they were invented. When you tighten the screw, a clamp gets tightened against the wire making a termination that is every bit as good as wrapping it around the screw. But the real bonus is that you can put two conductors under a screw AND you can use solid OR stranded wire (as seen in this pic, I am showing 10 gauge stranded wire).

You should see "backwire" listed as a feature on the packaging of the receptacle or switch. Expect to pay up to $3 per device. But they are built much better than economy receptacles.

JasonS
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Re: how many wires to one plug

Post by JasonS » Fri Jul 14, 2017 1:27 pm

perfect thanks so much.

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Aaron
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Re: how many wires to one plug

Post by Aaron » Fri Jul 14, 2017 1:40 pm

You're welcome, good luck! Just FYI, sometimes the backwire terminals can look a little different, as with this switch:
IMG_5946.JPG
IMG_5946.JPG (75.39 KiB) Viewed 70 times
But it's still exactly the same mechanical clamp connection. In fact, both this switch and the receptacle I posted above are the same brand, Legrand.

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emtnut
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Re: how many wires to one plug

Post by emtnut » Sat Jul 15, 2017 7:52 am

JasonS wrote:thanks for your response.is this what you mean by splicing with the screws?
i added a pic i found. also just wondering about the higher-quality spec-grade receptacle you talked about would you have a link to that item so i could ask my local build supplie store.

thanks

FH01NOV_OUTLET_05.jpg
Here is a link to HD. Most places should know what you want if you say spec grade.
https://www.homedepot.ca/en/home/p.spec ... 05628.html
~~ I'm right on 34 of 100 answers ... That ties me with Babe Ruth :mrgreen: ~~

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