Page 1 of 1

First time tool shopper

Posted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 8:21 pm
by Bestusernameever
Hey guys, looking for some assistance in putting together a list of tools to purchase. I just moved into my own home and don't have access to any tools. I know a lot of tools you purchase as needed however I'd like to put together a basic introductory list of tools and type/manufacturer to get me started (power tools and hand tools). Does anyone have a list or maybe a website suggestion?

Some of the things I'll be looking to do -
  • Basic home repair
    Installing new doors
    Drywall
    Framing/building out a closet
    Building simple furniture (shoe rack, spice rack, coffee table - probably will use wood, piping, and angle steel as basic materials)
    Sanding/staining stairs
    Installing back splash
    Refurbishing/refinishing furniture

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Mon Oct 16, 2017 9:50 pm
by Aaron
I'd say this is a good starter list:

Hand Tools:
- Tape measure (I like having centimeters and inches, they're sort of hard to find)
- Hammer (16 ounce Estwing seem to be a favorite in this forum)
- Pliers (Channellock 420 straight jaw, very all-purpose)
- 4-in-1 screw driver (I like Enderes Tools)
- 20-piece socket set (No opinion of any specific brand)
- Utility knife (The snap-off blade Olfa is my new favorite)

Safety:
- Safety Glasses
- Disposable dust masks
- Earplugs

Power Tools:
- Circular saw (corded, really any brand. Classic Skil saw.)
- 1/2" drill (corded. Mine is just a Black and Decker.)

That should really get you started for basic all-purpose projects. More specialized projects like electrical and plumbing require more specialized tools. You may want an orbital sander to sand and refinish your stairs, for example.

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 12:14 am
by A. Spruce
Shannon has actually prepared a pretty decent beginning DIY'rs tool list.

The primary thing to keep in mind is to always buy the best quality tools that you can afford and to take good care of them. You don't necessarily have to buy expensive tools, just good quality from trusted brands. For hand tools, Stanley's middle grade stuff is probably more than you'll ever need for casual use. There are times when any old piece of junk will suffice and there are times that you need and want the best that money can buy, the trick is to know and understand when these times arise.

When it comes to power tools, you absolutely need to stick to quality name brands, such as DeWalt, Milwaukee, Makita, Skil and stay away from brands like Ryobi or Harbor Freight. A good quality power tool will not only do what you need it to do every time you pick it up, it will do it safely. Cheap brands of power tools do not have the torque, fit and finish, or accuracy, which makes them dangerous and frustrating to use, and let's face it, if you hate the tool and are afraid of it, you won't use it. Stick to a trusted brand and you'll never regret your purchase.

Should you buy corded or cordless tools? This really depends on how much you're going to be using the tools. Corded tools tend to be cheaper and they will work every time you pick them up. Cordless tools go dead, even when not in use, and batteries have a shorter life span if they are not used consistently and frequently. You probably won't go wrong buying a cordless circular saw and drill combo, as these will be the two most used items in your arsenal, but most other things you'll probably want a corded version, things like a sawzall, jigsaw, even a circular saw because a cordless circular saw isn't that great for long cuts or rip cuts.

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 7:32 am
by Shannon
Ive got a video as well for a basic DIyer to watch for some tool choices.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJTi2lEe6Aw

With some of the projects you have on your list you may need a couple extra things, specific to drywall finishing and tiling work.

drywall square
drywall saw
drywall foot lift
drywall knives (3",6",8"12")
drywall mud tray
drywall mud mixing paddle (you need a 1/2" drill for this but maybe you can borrow it)
sanding block
notched trowel for mastic,mortar (1/4x1/4 or 3/8x3/8 notch)
rubber float
some kind of tile cutter depending on the tile you choose (this may be something you can rent or borrow)

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 12:07 pm
by DanM
Couple of backsplash tile related suggestions here. Some have already been mentioned but I'll make a list of all the stuff I can think of.

A Trowel of some sort:
*If you're going with a mosaic tile
- 3/16" V-notch trowel

*If you're going with medium sized tiles (4"x4" to 12"x12")
-1/4"x1/4"x1/4" or 1/4"x3/8"x1/4" square notch trowel (if your tile is closer to 12"x12" grab the bigger trowel).

Something to cut tile with (borrow one if you can, or try to find a used one. You'd be surprised how many people buy one do a single job then sell it.):

-Get an inexpensive wet saw from a decent brand, usually it'll look like a small table saw with a sliding tray. The vast majority of cuts you'll need to make, and types of material you might be cutting, can be done with a wet saw. Don't go full on bargain basement but you aren't going to need a $1000 wet saw with all the bells and whistles either. Get something decent enough and if you decide to do some other tiling in the future you'll be glad you've got one.
-Buy a high end blade for your wet saw, this can make a huge difference in how well the saw performs. Cheaper blades tend to chip/rip tile edges.

Misc:

-Grout float.
-Spacer wedges. These small wedges are super useful for getting your first row perfectly straight. Once that row is perfect you can use regular spacers as you go up.
-A big sponge.
-A few buckets.

Glass or Stone tile specific stuff:
-Something to polish cut edges with (a rubbing stone or wet sanding block is cheap and works well, but it does take a bit of elbow grease). The cut edge on a glass tile that's going to be visible needs to be polished to get rid of jagged parts that'll cut you up pretty good and so they shine properly. For stone tiles it's really handy to have since you can make your own 'factory' edges if you have exposed cut sides or bevel & polish the border tiles of the backsplash.

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 12:36 pm
by A. Spruce
DanM wrote:
Tue Oct 17, 2017 12:07 pm
borrow one if you can, or try to find a used one. You'd be surprised how many people buy one do a single job then sell it.
For tools that will be used once but necessary to the job at hand, Craigslist or a rental yard. I prefer to own the tool because the quality is usually better and there is no nagging time limit/expense hanging over my head, so total focus can be given to the job, not worrying about the expenses. When done with tools of this nature they can go right back to Craigslist and sold to recoup your money, giving you "free" rental of the tool for as long as you need it. Now, for high dollar tools, a rental yard is likely the better option, not always, but usually.

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 12:46 pm
by DanM
A. Spruce wrote:
Tue Oct 17, 2017 12:36 pm
DanM wrote:
Tue Oct 17, 2017 12:07 pm
borrow one if you can, or try to find a used one. You'd be surprised how many people buy one do a single job then sell it.
For tools that will be used once but necessary to the job at hand, Craigslist or a rental yard. I prefer to own the tool because the quality is usually better and there is no nagging time limit/expense hanging over my head, so total focus can be given to the job, not worrying about the expenses. When done with tools of this nature they can go right back to Craigslist and sold to recoup your money, giving you "free" rental of the tool for as long as you need it. Now, for high dollar tools, a rental yard is likely the better option, not always, but usually.
100% agreed. It's usually almost as much to rent a $250 (new) tool for a weekend as it is to buy a good used one, plus you get to keep it or resell it.

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Tue Oct 17, 2017 4:02 pm
by Shannon
Look at every project as it is coming up and use them to slowly build up your arsenal !

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Fri Feb 23, 2018 2:18 am
by Charlice
Another thing you can look at is a loaded tool bag.

It'll be useful for keeping all your tools in one place.

A tool bag is like an inside-out toolbox; all of the gear is exposed, stowed in dedicated pouches and pockets and easy to see and grab.

You could buy a bag and load it up with tools yourself—or just purchase the Craftsman Evolv ($40 at Sears). It contains all the basics: screwdrivers, measuring tape, hammer, pliers, utility knife, and a plastic sorting tray for the nails, hooks, and screws you collects over the course of your projects.

This is far from every hand tool you'll ever need, but there’s room to add more as you builds your collection.

Fortunately, others have provided some of the most important tools you will need as a first timer.

Goodluck!

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Fri Feb 23, 2018 7:58 am
by Shannon
Yes tool type bags are the new normal compared to tool boxes now.

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Fri Feb 23, 2018 2:59 pm
by Aaron
Yeah that seems to be the case. (pun!)

I like my bright yellow plastic tool box. It's reasonably light weight and has that tray that sits on top of the box part of it. Seems pretty practical.

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Fri Feb 23, 2018 3:39 pm
by emtnut
Charlice wrote:
Fri Feb 23, 2018 2:18 am
Another thing you can look at is a loaded tool bag.

It'll be useful for keeping all your tools in one place.

A tool bag is like an inside-out toolbox; all of the gear is exposed, stowed in dedicated pouches and pockets and easy to see and grab.

You could buy a bag and load it up with tools yourself—or just purchase the Craftsman Evolv ($40 at Sears). It contains all the basics: screwdrivers, measuring tape, hammer, pliers, utility knife, and a plastic sorting tray for the nails, hooks, and screws you collects over the course of your projects.

This is far from every hand tool you'll ever need, but there’s room to add more as you builds your collection.

Fortunately, others have provided some of the most important tools you will need as a first timer.

Goodluck!
Well first off, Welcome to the forum Charlice :D

Agree with the tool bag. All my tool boxes are in my shop, and out in the shed.
It's much easier working out of the tool bag !

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Fri Feb 23, 2018 6:57 pm
by Shannon
So my son has started his career as an electrician and has been working for about a year as an apprentice, he came home home last week and had purchased an electricians back pack tool bag. Took everything out of his standard issue electricians tool bag/pouch that we have all seen on the work sites for years and put it all in this back pack. I suppose it may be easier to carry but looks like a PITA to have sitting on the floor open trying to work from. The old bags/pouches sat perfectly and were open to easily access and see everything in it. I guess these kids grew up with back packs going to school for 12 yrs so it seems more natural for them? Time will tell .

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Fri Feb 23, 2018 8:02 pm
by emtnut
Shannon wrote:
Fri Feb 23, 2018 6:57 pm
So my son has started his career as an electrician and has been working for about a year as an apprentice
I'm very sorry to hear that Shannon. I hope the family is taking it OK :(

:lol: :lol: :mrgreen:

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Fri Feb 23, 2018 10:01 pm
by Shannon
emtnut wrote:
Fri Feb 23, 2018 8:02 pm
Shannon wrote:
Fri Feb 23, 2018 6:57 pm
So my son has started his career as an electrician and has been working for about a year as an apprentice
I'm very sorry to hear that Shannon. I hope the family is taking it OK :(

:lol: :lol: :mrgreen:
I applaud the fact he chose the easier cleaner electrician career as apprised to my own.😉

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Fri Feb 23, 2018 11:56 pm
by A. Spruce
I much preferred working out of a bucket. Being a general contractor I was usually doing something different every day, it was far easier to have the daily basics in my toolbelt and use the bucket for the specialty items that each new day/new job required. Best part was, i could dump the tools on the floor and have the bucket to catch a leak, carry water, or haul debris, not too many people would be willing to do that with a toolbag or backpack. :mrgreen:

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 6:57 am
by Shannon
Yes at times I will use a bucket as well to cart around smaller loose tools from spot to spot. On larger projects out doors I will use a wheel barrel or even a wagon as my catch all cart. Everything goes back in them at end of the day and gets put inside for the night then comes back out in morning.

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 12:58 pm
by A. Spruce
Shannon wrote:
Sat Feb 24, 2018 6:57 am
On larger projects out doors I will use a wheel barrel or even a wagon as my catch all cart. Everything goes back in them at end of the day and gets put inside for the night then comes back out in morning.
Well, sure, you can do that . . . if you work out of a trailer. :mrgreen: I had big Brute garbage cans on rollers that I will admit to using as a tool caddy on the big jobs. Oh, sure, the cans were primarily waste haulers, but they make great tool haulers too. :geek:

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 8:46 pm
by Aaron
I'm really bad keeping my tools in one place during and between projects. "Where the hell did I set my damn hammer? !*#$%!!"

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 9:49 pm
by A. Spruce
Aaron wrote:
Sat Feb 24, 2018 8:46 pm
I'm really bad keeping my tools in one place during and between projects. "Where the hell did I set my damn hammer? !*#$%!!"
I don't generally lose things, it drives me nuts when I can't find something I use every day. There was one time that I lost my speed square, looked all over for it, figured it had grown legs and walked away on one of the days I had been helping build a set at the local theater. 6 weeks later I'm back helping to dismantle things and guess what I found! Apparently I had left it on the floor where I was setting up a spring release for a prop and it had gotten covered over with other set pieces before I realized it was missing. :oops: :mrgreen: Beats the time that the technical director (guy in charge of building sets ) borrowed my tape measure and didn't return it. Next day when I when I got there he'd put his name on the darned thing and it was sitting on his shelf! :| :roll: :lol: :lol:

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 11:46 pm
by Aaron
But did he etch his name on it? Because Sharpie wipes right off with denatured alcohol. lol

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Sat Feb 24, 2018 11:51 pm
by A. Spruce
Nah, just sharpie, which I'm well versed at removing. Which is actually a good topic to have elsewhere, how to remove ink and label glue from things.

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Sun Feb 25, 2018 12:43 am
by Aaron
That is a great topic!

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Sun Feb 25, 2018 1:11 pm
by emtnut
Shannon wrote:
Fri Feb 23, 2018 10:01 pm
emtnut wrote:
Fri Feb 23, 2018 8:02 pm


I'm very sorry to hear that Shannon. I hope the family is taking it OK :(

:lol: :lol: :mrgreen:
I applaud the fact he chose the easier cleaner electrician career as apprised to my own.😉
Smart kid .... Must get it from his Mom :mrgreen: :lol: :lol: :o

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Sun Feb 25, 2018 8:32 pm
by Shannon
emtnut wrote:
Sun Feb 25, 2018 1:11 pm

Smart kid .... Must get it from his Mom :mrgreen: :lol: :lol:
Yes sir he did! ;)

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Wed Mar 28, 2018 9:57 am
by housetwinkle
Aaron wrote:
Mon Oct 16, 2017 9:50 pm
I'd say this is a good starter list:

Hand Tools:
- Tape measure (I like having centimeters and inches, they're sort of hard to find)
- Hammer (16 ounce Estwing seem to be a favorite in this forum)
- Pliers (Channellock 420 straight jaw, very all-purpose)
- 4-in-1 screw driver (I like Enderes Tools)
- 20-piece socket set (No opinion of any specific brand)
- Utility knife (The snap-off blade Olfa is my new favorite)

Safety:
- Safety Glasses
- Disposable dust masks
- Earplugs

Power Tools:
- Circular saw (corded, really any brand. Classic Skil saw.)
- 1/2" drill (corded. Mine is just a Black and Decker.)

That should really get you started for basic all-purpose projects. More specialized projects like electrical and plumbing require more specialized tools. You may want an orbital sander to sand and refinish your stairs, for example.
This starter list is great, thank you!
Anything else safety-wise? Some work gloves?

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Wed Mar 28, 2018 11:06 am
by A. Spruce
housetwinkle wrote:
Wed Mar 28, 2018 9:57 am
This starter list is great, thank you!
Anything else safety-wise? Some work gloves?
Gloves, safety glasses, hearing protection, all are good things to have in your tool arsenal, they're just not necessarily going to be in your tool kit.

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Wed Apr 04, 2018 10:22 pm
by A. Spruce
Hey Shannon, I found a new item for you to add to your toolkit article. :mrgreen:

Image

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Thu Apr 05, 2018 6:41 am
by Shannon
Interesting packaging!

Re: First time tool shopper

Posted: Thu Jun 14, 2018 10:13 am
by Huang Joo
Shannon wrote:
Fri Feb 23, 2018 7:58 am
Yes tool type bags are the new normal compared to tool boxes now.
I have seen many guys are using 'tool box' in order to keep their tools in one place. And when needed they might get them easily.