Hanging drywall - horizontal vs vertical

Ask your kitchen related question here
Post Reply
jls1948
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2017 8:16 am

Hanging drywall - horizontal vs vertical

Post by jls1948 » Wed Jan 04, 2017 8:33 am

I have been told 2 different ways to hand dry wall on being vertical and one being horizontal, does any body know if it matters :?:

User avatar
A. Spruce
Posts: 6314
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2016 5:23 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Dry Wall

Post by A. Spruce » Wed Jan 04, 2017 8:53 am

Nope, it does not. You will have a little less taping if you hang it vertical, the problem is, unless the room is fairly large, you're probably not going to find a stud layout that will work well for vertical hanging.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

jls1948
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2017 8:16 am

Re: Hanging drywall - horizontal vs vertical

Post by jls1948 » Wed Jan 04, 2017 9:56 am

Thanks for your reply

sats4eva
Posts: 7
Joined: Sun Jan 03, 2016 11:01 am

Re: Hanging drywall - horizontal vs vertical

Post by sats4eva » Fri Jan 13, 2017 7:40 am

Shouldn't make a huge difference but if you have shorter walls, then you may want to go horizontal to minimize waste in some cases. I always prefer to go horizontal myself and vertical only when I need to do so. Shannon actually has some great taping videos (I watched a bunch of them) to get started after the drywall phase is complete

User avatar
Aaron
Posts: 3524
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2015 4:03 pm
Location: St. Paul, MN

Re: Hanging drywall - horizontal vs vertical

Post by Aaron » Fri Jan 13, 2017 12:34 pm

sats4eva wrote:Shannon actually has some great taping videos (I watched a bunch of them) to get started after the drywall phase is complete
I never knew how to use the traditional paper tape before watching those videos.

User avatar
Aaron
Posts: 3524
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2015 4:03 pm
Location: St. Paul, MN

Re: Hanging drywall - horizontal vs vertical

Post by Aaron » Fri Jan 13, 2017 1:01 pm

I was just thinking that theoretically you should be able to hang drywall vertically since studs are traditionally 16 inches on-center. Since the width of a sheet of drywall is 4 feet, that is 48 inches. So that would span 3 stud cavities (3 times 16).

You run into issues I think when wood studs aren't perfectly straight, and I think unless you buy the most choice lumber from the dryest lumbar yard, they tend to flex and be off +/- a half inch or so, which can be just enough not to give you wood to drive a screw in where you need it to be.

In commercial construction, they more often use steel studs and you pretty much don't have that problem at all. You have perfect 16" OC everywhere, and everything lines up. I'm getting more and more interested in steel studs, though I wonder how it stands up to things hanging off the wall--like cabinets. Anyone know?

User avatar
A. Spruce
Posts: 6314
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2016 5:23 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Hanging drywall - horizontal vs vertical

Post by A. Spruce » Fri Jan 13, 2017 3:35 pm

Being a remodeling contractor, I can honestly say that accurate framing, regardless of age of home, is something that you just don't find. Yes, the standard is 16" and 24" on center, but warped wood and less than attentive framers, not to mention other remodeling projects done to a structure, means that you're not likely going to find a time where vertical hanging is going to be feasible. Long walls get broken up by rooms, so what was good spacing now becomes off.

The good news is that drywall is cheap, so having to toss a few inches from the end of a sheet isn't that big a deal. Don't throw scraps away until the end because you never know when what you cut off for one area is going to be a perfect fit for another.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

User avatar
Shannon
Posts: 13226
Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 11:58 pm
Location: Canada
Contact:

Re: Hanging drywall - horizontal vs vertical

Post by Shannon » Fri Jan 13, 2017 11:16 pm

In basements where I can not get sheets longer than 8' in I always stand the sheets vertically. I would rather have floor to ceiling tapered joints to mud then a whole bunch of extra butt joints. It helps that I always have done the framing as well myself for those jobs and was extra particular with spacing and plumbness of studs. If this is existing framing standing vertical sheets could prove to be a test of your sanity! :? :evil:
If you've found our videos or website information helpful, please considering making a donation using PayPal or pledging us on Patreon

User avatar
emtnut
Posts: 1926
Joined: Mon Mar 02, 2015 7:21 am
Location: Canada
Contact:

Re: Hanging drywall - horizontal vs vertical

Post by emtnut » Sun Jan 15, 2017 1:21 pm

I've almost always gone vertical, but mainly because I work alone most of the time, and I find it's easier to work that way.

Not sure how much truth there is to it, but someone told me that it's best to line up the joints according to how the light enters the room. Supposedly it hides imperfections better.
If that's true, then most ground level rooms would benefit from horizontal runs ?? :?
~~ Ford Ford Ford Ford Ford Ford :mrgreen: ~~

User avatar
A. Spruce
Posts: 6314
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2016 5:23 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Hanging drywall - horizontal vs vertical

Post by A. Spruce » Sun Jan 15, 2017 3:17 pm

emtnut wrote:Not sure how much truth there is to it, but someone told me that it's best to line up the joints according to how the light enters the room. Supposedly it hides imperfections better.
If that's true, then most ground level rooms would benefit from horizontal runs ?? :?
Most likely said by someone who either couldn't, or didn't care to, do good work. It takes very little effort to not have visible imperfections, lumps, bumps, joints, fasteners, etc. In tract homes you get little more than fire taping with a super heavy texture to hide the fact that the walls were not taped well.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

Mastercarpentry
Posts: 197
Joined: Mon Jan 16, 2017 8:08 pm

Re: Hanging drywall - horizontal vs vertical

Post by Mastercarpentry » Mon Jan 16, 2017 8:36 pm

Here in the SE US horizontal is the norm. With more than one person working it's faster, has less waste, and is faster and easier to finish because most of the joints are easier to get at when standing. Also 54" rock is available to use horizontally for 9" ceilings. And horizontal helps resist stud bowing that could open a joint on a vertical hang. You'd never hang a ceiling in-line with the joists so treat the walls the same way.

Commercial firecode work is sometimes vertical as it makes it easier to get a good fit at corrugated metal roofs- excessive gaps gets an inspection fail and you only need to get it right for 4' instead of more. That's where I began working with sheetrock long ago, man that 5/8" Type X was heavy in 12' sheets!

Phil

User avatar
Aaron
Posts: 3524
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2015 4:03 pm
Location: St. Paul, MN

Re: Hanging drywall - horizontal vs vertical

Post by Aaron » Mon Jan 16, 2017 10:57 pm

Mastercarpentry wrote:Here in the SE US horizontal is the norm. With more than one person working it's faster, has less waste, and is faster and easier to finish because most of the joints are easier to get at when standing. Also 54" rock is available to use horizontally for 9" ceilings. And horizontal helps resist stud bowing that could open a joint on a vertical hang. You'd never hang a ceiling in-line with the joists so treat the walls the same way.
Oh that makes perfect sense when you compare to how you'd hang it on the ceiling--across the joists.

Perhaps that's another thing you don't get with the steel studs--bowing? I just see a lot of vertical-oriented Type X 5/8" on steel studs in commercial construction. Makes sense because ostensibly there'd be less butt joints to tape and mud.

I've always done horizontal myself in the house, with standard lumbar studs.
Mastercarpentry wrote:Commercial firecode work is sometimes vertical as it makes it easier to get a good fit at corrugated metal roofs- excessive gaps gets an inspection fail and you only need to get it right for 4' instead of more. That's where I began working with sheetrock long ago, man that 5/8" Type X was heavy in 12' sheets!
Oh no doubt, 12' long is crazy heavy. I can't even fathom the weight of 5/8" sheets that long! Could be work carrying it though, for reduced taping and mudding. Well maybe. lol

User avatar
A. Spruce
Posts: 6314
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2016 5:23 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Hanging drywall - horizontal vs vertical

Post by A. Spruce » Mon Jan 16, 2017 11:06 pm

In my wee early days as a laborer, I had the distinguished honor of stacking more than a few commercial projects with 12' 5/8 drywall, you think a two pack of 8' is heavy, you'd better have eaten your Wheaties the day you start hefting 12'ers around! :shock: Thankfully I never had to help hang that stuff overhead!
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

User avatar
Shannon
Posts: 13226
Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 11:58 pm
Location: Canada
Contact:

Re: Hanging drywall - horizontal vs vertical

Post by Shannon » Tue Jan 17, 2017 7:25 am

Delivering drywall has to be one of the worst jobs out there IMO. I'm sure that job has wrecked many young mens backs.
If you've found our videos or website information helpful, please considering making a donation using PayPal or pledging us on Patreon

Post Reply