Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

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DPFAST
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Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by DPFAST » Wed Oct 17, 2018 10:28 am

So after removal of a very large mirror and an old vanity I got this left with. How can I best to fix this before painting
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A. Spruce
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by A. Spruce » Wed Oct 17, 2018 12:35 pm

Because the surface of the drywall has been torn off, those brown fuzzy areas are going to continue to peel when they get wet with drywall compound. The glue used on the mirror is petroleum based, which has left an oil stain on the wall which is going to bleed through your repairs and affect your paint.

Use an oil based primer, like original Kilz, and prime the damaged areas and stains, including those black streaks of glue below the peeled areas.

Now you're ready to float out the damaged areas with topping compound. Lightweight compound would be acceptable too, since you have some taping of the wall you opened up. DO NOT float these areas with joint compound, as it dries extremely hard and is extremely hard to sand smooth. Topping and lightweight compounds do not dry as hard, ergo, they are easier to sand smooth.

The texture is what's known as an "orange peel", it's was simply blown on with a texture hopper. Aerosol can texture may reasonably duplicate this, though you'll have better results from a Homax pump gun or best results with a texture hopper. You don't have to buy the expensive Homax refills, you can simply water down topping compound and use that as texture, works just as good.
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by DPFAST » Wed Oct 17, 2018 10:03 pm

A. Spruce wrote:
Wed Oct 17, 2018 12:35 pm
Because the surface of the drywall has been torn off, those brown fuzzy areas are going to continue to peel when they get wet with drywall compound. The glue used on the mirror is petroleum based, which has left an oil stain on the wall which is going to bleed through your repairs and affect your paint.

Use an oil based primer, like original Kilz, and prime the damaged areas and stains, including those black streaks of glue below the peeled areas.

Thanks soo much for this advice. I didn't know any of it. So 2-3 coats should be enough?

Now you're ready to float out the damaged areas with topping compound. Lightweight compound would be acceptable too, since you have some taping of the wall you opened up. DO NOT float these areas with joint compound, as it dries extremely hard and is extremely hard to sand smooth. Topping and lightweight compounds do not dry as hard, ergo, they are easier to sand smooth.

I also didn't know about this Topping Compound, Yesterday I purchased teh pink stuff that dries in 30 minutes. Would that work or not really? If not I will purchase a Topping Compound. Any idea how to go about fixing the wall on the first picture. It sims when I try to peel off the loose paint it keeps peeling and peeling. I dont care about fixing this as much as the mirror wall as my new vanity is much taller and it will cover up the damage. I just don't want it to peel beyond more than couple of inches.

The texture is what's known as an "orange peel", it's was simply blown on with a texture hopper. Aerosol can texture may reasonably duplicate this, though you'll have better results from a Homax pump gun or best results with a texture hopper. You don't have to buy the expensive Homax refills, you can simply water down topping compound and use that as texture, works just as good.
As far as the pain texture goes, I really don't care for it. I just want a regular smooth surface on walls in my bathroom. After applying the compound and sending it, should I send the rest of the wall, the old paint before paint a new color to maintain an even texture under a new paint? Thank you so much Spruce again for your help

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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by A. Spruce » Wed Oct 17, 2018 10:56 pm

One or two coats of primer should suffice, you're just trying to seal it enough that the moisture from the mud doesn't activate peeling.

I'm not familiar with "the red stuff" compound. It sounds like it's a "setting" type mud, which is very difficult for a first timer to use successfully because it tends to dry before you can get it applied and is very hard to sand. It takes a deft hand to mix it properly and a fast hand to get it applied before it fires off (sets). I recommend sticking to regular premixed muds for the novice. Once you get some experience then I am all for you experimenting with setting type muds, they really speed up the process once you figure out how to use them.

As for the peeling paint, remove what comes off easily without encouraging more peeling, you might want to score the larger flakes before pulling so that you don't loosen any more than necessary.

Once you float the repairs smooth, you can skim coat the entire wall to get those smooth walls you want, this floating will not only get rid of the texture, it will blend where paint has peeled. Once floated, sand the surface smooth. I sand with one hand and feel the surface with the other, marking places with a pencil that will need more mudding attention later. A quick pencil dash or circle for small spot just so you know where they are later. Repeat the floating process until you have your desired finish.

I generally work with a 3", 6", and 12" drywall knife. The 3" is mostly to load my pan and cream the mud in the pan. The 6" is my most used knife used for joints, the 12" knife is for floating out seams and walls.

You can either buy a bucket of mud or a box of mud, in which case you will need a clean 5 gallon bucket with a tight fitting lid. Transfer the box of mud to the bucket, add 1 to 2 cups of clean water and cream it with a mixing paddle until you get the consistency you desire. Thinning the mud slightly will make it easier to work with, but add the water little bits at a time to get there, too much and it won't stay on your knife.
Image

Once your walls are completely finished, use two coats of primer and two coats of a good quality top coat. I like Zinsser Bull's Eye 123 blue label for general purpose primer needs and stick with Dealer brand paints. If you absolutely have to use a big box offering, Valspar is a good brand, Behr is complete crap, not fond of Glidden or most of the other big box offerings, which is why I say stay away from them.
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by Shannon » Thu Oct 18, 2018 7:50 am

Spruce said it perfectly, all I can add is at the areas that have to loose torn paper I will usually use a sharp utility knife /razor blade to score through the paper about a half inch further out then the loose area, you can then remove the old loose layer usually without damaging any further out.
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by DPFAST » Thu Oct 18, 2018 8:58 am

A. Spruce wrote:
Wed Oct 17, 2018 10:56 pm

I'm not familiar with "the red stuff" compound. It sounds like it's a "setting" type mud, which is very difficult for a first timer to use successfully because it tends to dry before you can get it applied and is very hard to sand. It takes a deft hand to mix it properly and a fast hand to get it applied before it fires off (sets). I recommend sticking to regular premixed muds for the novice. Once you get some experience then I am all for you experimenting with setting type muds, they really speed up the process once you figure out how to use them.

It's actually the PINK stuff that when dries it turns white so you know when you can send it or painted. Yes, it sounds like its the fast drying stuff. This regular compound you are referring to requires 24 hours between sending so when we are talking 2-3 coats we are talking of 2-3 days spent just on preparing the wall for painting, is this correct?

As for the peeling paint, remove what comes off easily without encouraging more peeling, you might want to score the larger flakes before pulling so that you don't loosen any more than necessary.

Thanks for the tip on cutting the bigger flakes first before pulling.

Once you float the repairs smooth, you can skim coat the entire wall to get those smooth walls you want, this floating will not only get rid of the texture, it will blend where paint has peeled. Once floated, sand the surface smooth. I sand with one hand and feel the surface with the other, marking places with a pencil that will need more mudding attention later. A quick pencil dash or circle for small spot just so you know where they are later. Repeat the floating process until you have your desired finish.

I don't really wanna create a lot of dust while sending so is possible to use an electric sander with vacuum hose attached to my shop vac?

You can either buy a bucket of mud or a box of mud, in which case you will need a clean 5 gallon bucket with a tight fitting lid. Transfer the box of mud to the bucket, add 1 to 2 cups of clean water and cream it with a mixing paddle until you get the consistency you desire. Thinning the mud slightly will make it easier to work with, but add the water little bits at a time to get there, too much and it won't stay on your knife.
Image

Do I need this much of mud? 5 gallons sims little much for this small wall, isn't it? Maybe not?

Once your walls are completely finished, use two coats of primer and two coats of a good quality top coat. I like Zinsser Bull's Eye 123 blue label for general purpose primer needs and stick with Dealer brand paints. If you absolutely have to use a big box offering, Valspar is a good brand, Behr is complete crap, not fond of Glidden or most of the other big box offerings, which is why I say stay away from them.

My local HD caries the Zinsser primer. Thanks for that. How about of Benjamin&Moore paint? I their dealer near me. Thanks

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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by DPFAST » Thu Oct 18, 2018 8:59 am

Shannon wrote:
Thu Oct 18, 2018 7:50 am
Spruce said it perfectly, all I can add is at the areas that have to loose torn paper I will usually use a sharp utility knife /razor blade to score through the paper about a half inch further out then the loose area, you can then remove the old loose layer usually without damaging any further out.
Thank Shannon for this tip. This actually makes sense.

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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by A. Spruce » Thu Oct 18, 2018 12:05 pm

DPFAST wrote:
Thu Oct 18, 2018 8:58 am
It's actually the PINK stuff that when dries it turns white so you know when you can send it or painted. Yes, it sounds like its the fast drying stuff. This regular compound you are referring to requires 24 hours between sending so when we are talking 2-3 coats we are talking of 2-3 days spent just on preparing the wall for painting, is this correct?
I have not used it, so I can't comment specifically on it. If it is fast setting you don't want it because you don't have the experience using it. You can try, I suppose, but why make the learning experience any harder than it has to be. Drywall work is EXTREMELY easy, using setting muds is VERY difficult for the novice. As for the color change when it's dry, it's a gimmick as far as I'm concerned. It is obvious when drywall mud is wet or dry and when it's dry enough to do another coat.

Mud does not have to be fully dried out before you can add another coat. Set up a fan to circulate the air if you want faster drying time. Once you have all the drywall work completely done, then allow 24 to 48 hours to completely dry before you start priming/painting.
DPFAST wrote:
Thu Oct 18, 2018 8:58 am
I don't really wanna create a lot of dust while sending so is possible to use an electric sander with vacuum hose attached to my shop vac?
Not sure if it's a typo or misunderstanding, the term is "sanding", not "sending". You will get less dust by hand sanding. You can also set a fan in a window to push the dust out OR put a cheap, mesh furnace filter on the fan within the room to capture the dust. Definitely wear a dust mask and you'll want to seal the room off as best you can to keep the dust contained within the room and not floating throughout the house. There are hand sanders that you can attach a vacuum to if you want to go that route, it helps some, but there's still going to be a lot of ambient dust.
DPFAST wrote:
Thu Oct 18, 2018 8:58 am
Do I need this much of mud? 5 gallons sims little much for this small wall, isn't it? Maybe not?
Well, you've got to tape the hole where you relocated the plumbing and you've got wall repairs from the mirror, then you're talking about floating out the entire room to get rid of the texture. Yes, you're going to go through at least 5 gallons of compound. For all the topping and floating work, use topping mud or lightweight mud. For the joints you need regular joint compound or multi-purpose, lightweight may suffice, I'm not sure, it's not something I'm all that familiar with because I prefer dedicated joint compound for my first coat of taping and then use topping from there on. Shannon is more familiar with lightweight to know if they are suitable for joint taping needs. The product label will tell you as well.

What's the difference between joint compound and topping compound, joint dries much harder and is very hard to sand, whereas topping is very soft and easy to sand. Over the years they've come out with multi-purpose and lightweight, which have varying degrees of sandability, of the two, lightweight should sand the easiest.
DPFAST wrote:
Thu Oct 18, 2018 8:58 am
My local HD caries the Zinsser primer. Thanks for that. How about of Benjamin&Moore paint? I their dealer near me. Thanks
BM is a good brand, go for it. Semi-gloss in bathrooms, it is more water resistant and washable.
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by Shannon » Thu Oct 18, 2018 11:56 pm

I generally can get two coats on in a day on a one or two room Reno as long as they are not in areas like inside corners where it is a little thicker and takes overnight to dry. Some air circulation and or even a small heater will help a lot. So about 4-6 hrs between coats depending on conditions and thickness of coat. Don’t maybe expect that as a new mudder
But it’s for sure not out of the question.
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by A. Spruce » Fri Oct 19, 2018 12:06 am

The biggest factor in drying time is air circulation, especially if you can put the fan directly on the area. I've got several Patton fans that I use for such things. There are other brands of similar design at better pricing.
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by DPFAST » Fri Oct 19, 2018 7:47 am

Such a great info on all of this, thank you so much guys. Since I am changing along with the vanity also the light fixture and a new mirror I am thinking that the best way would be to start high and work to the bottom, right? No sense setting up the plumbing on the floor and then fixing the wall. It just makes more sense to me. Unfortunately I only have Mondays and Tuesdays off from work so these are the only days I can actually work on this project.

Question on hanging a new mirror? Should I use the black glue again or the clips would be sufficient to hang a large mirror on the wall?

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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by Shannon » Fri Oct 19, 2018 12:18 pm

Fix all your patches if you can with less stuff in the way .
Mirror clips will work fine. Best to have the bottom ones screwed to studs.
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by A. Spruce » Fri Oct 19, 2018 1:44 pm

You can stub your plumbing out of the wall, repair the wall and do all the drywall work, even the painting, then go back and finish out the plumbing when you set the cabinet.

I like to use a J-track on the bottom of mirrors with clips on top. The J-track is usually sitting on the backsplash if the mirror is large enough and needs the extra support. The top clips do not need to be in studs, but the bottom fasteners do, whether using clips or J-track
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by DPFAST » Mon Oct 22, 2018 7:35 pm

Hi again. Unfortunately had a little delay on this project today but anyway, got the floor cleaned out and walls ready for treatment. As I was taking the old light fixture out and all of the towel hangers and such, I've taken several drywall anchors out of the wall creating little holes. I was wondering if skim coating would take care of this or should I use some kind of spackle first to fill the holes and then skim coat the whole wall? Thanks again

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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by A. Spruce » Mon Oct 22, 2018 8:12 pm

Force drywall mud into the hole so that it leaves a slight lump on the surface. When dry, use your drywall knife to scrape it smooth, float out the wall from there.
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by DPFAST » Mon Oct 22, 2018 8:14 pm

A. Spruce wrote:
Mon Oct 22, 2018 8:12 pm
Force drywall mud into the hole so that it leaves a slight lump on the surface. When dry, use your drywall knife to scrape it smooth, float out the wall from there.
Got it! Thanks again

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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by DPFAST » Tue Oct 23, 2018 5:48 pm

OK. SO I am between coats of a mud. So I think I made few mistakes and wonder if I can still get out of this.

1. When I patched up the hole left by the medicine cabinet using piece of 1/2 inch drywall I didn't notice at first that the right side next to the back wall was little higher than the left side. I noticed that after mudding it. I'v installed the piece of drywall on the tight side with not much room between the wall and the piece of drywall. I'll try to correct this with the second compound application and 14 inch knife.

2. When installing this piece of drywall, I forgot to use a drywall tape on the joints. Would that be a problem or can I still use the tape during second application?

3. I took the risk and used the "EasySand 90" fast setting compound to do this while applying small, thin amounts of compound to the rough spots and missing drywall paper areas. Not as hard as I thought although, I think I diluted to little too hard and after the 30 minutes was little challenging to spread that thing out. Fortunately I used just a 1/5 of the bag so I still have way much for another coat.

4. Is there anyway to use the AllPurpose Compound as the third application and skim the whole area for more even surface?

5. I also scrubbed the surface of the ceiling and was wondering if I should skim coat the ceiling before painting it or just use the 123 Bulls Eye primer and then just paint it white?

Thanks
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by A. Spruce » Tue Oct 23, 2018 6:08 pm

Nope, there's no recovery from that, gonna have to tear the house down now! ;) :mrgreen:

1 - Corners and seams are always going to be thicker than everywhere else, don't worry about it, just build up the mud until it's the same level and smooth. You're probably going to want to stick to your 6" knife until you've taped it to your satisfaction, then switch to the 14" knife for skim coating.

2 - You can tape your joints now, no worries. The point of the tape is that it doesn't allow the "crack" of the joint to come through. If you're working with mesh tape, apply the tape then mud, if you're using paper tape, you have to apply a coat of mud to bed the tape into, lay it off, then coat over the tape. In the corner, you will bed the entire corner, but only top coat half, or one side of it, let it dry, then come back and top coat the other side. This keeps you from digging a trough in the corner. In your final skim coat, you can probably do both sides of the corner in one shot.

3 - When using a setting type compound, you only work with it as long as it's easily pliable, once it starts to set, you're done! Clean out the pan, knife, and start with a new batch. If you're finding you can't get it mixed and out of the pan before it's setting on you, then you need to use more water in your initial mixing.

4 - You can switch mud types at any time during the process. As I stated earlier, premixed muds take longer to dry, which give you a longer working time. In the case of topping mud, it is a smoother, creamier product, which results in easier working it onto the surface and sanding later.

5 - What you do with the ceiling is your call. If you're happy with all those pock marks, prime and paint it, if you want a smooth surface, float it out first. It shouldn't take but one very light skim coat to get rid of the holes and smooth the entire surface.

6 - Somebody owes me a beer! :mrgreen: :lol:
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by DPFAST » Tue Oct 23, 2018 6:16 pm

I sure do. Next time you're in Chicago let me know. I'll take you out for a 'cold one'. Thanks so very much Spruce ;)

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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by Shannon » Tue Oct 23, 2018 8:16 pm

This is a link to our complete drywall video playlist, maybe it can help you along as well.
https://m.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCF6D5F910F11A363
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by DPFAST » Tue Oct 23, 2018 8:26 pm

Shannon wrote:
Tue Oct 23, 2018 8:16 pm
This is a link to our complete drywall video playlist, maybe it can help you along as well.
https://m.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCF6D5F910F11A363
Thanks Shannon. I already did watch your plumbing and drywall videos for the last few months. That's how I found your forum and how I decided to start this project of mine. It's just that you make it look soo easy but in reality I find myself to have more questions and that is why I joined your forum. Very helpful so far. Thanks very much

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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by Shannon » Tue Oct 23, 2018 10:02 pm

Glad to hear you came here from the you tube channel originally.
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by DPFAST » Tue Oct 30, 2018 5:00 pm

OK. So I finally was able to get the walls partially coated with Gardz, skim coated twice with EasySand90, sanded, skimcoated for the last third time with All Purpose Joint Compound, sanded again and now waiting for everything to dry. After I skimcoated with the All Purpose I directed a large fan at the wall and after an hour the wall felt very dry to the touch so I did my sanding. Much easier to sand than the EasySand90 but even that hot mud wasn't that hard especially with the rougher side of the sanding sponge. You guys were so right about the hot mud setting very quickly on me even the 90 minutes is enough time for a PRO, for me it wasn't enough time. I will definitely use it in the future for fixing small areas, nail holes etc. but skim coating walls is beyond my ability at least for now.

Question:

1. How long should I wait for the All Purpose to dry out before I can paint with the '123 Bulls Eye Plus"? (I have fans pointed at the wall and everything already feels dry to touch. Just not sure if its already dry inside? It's been already 2-3 hours after skim coating it.

2. Is '123 BE Plus' any better or can it be used the same way as the regular '123 BE'?

3. Since I only partially skimcoated the wall, can I use a special roller or a paint to even out the surface of the wall throughout? I'd like to maybe have small 'orange peel' effect so my 'newbie' skimcoating/painting project looks more even.

4. Can the '123 BE Plus' be used on the ceiling? I'd like to paint the ceiling with the '123 BE Plus' white primer only. Does that makes any sense? This way I can just paint the whole thing and then just use color paint on the walls afterwords?

5. What kind of paint roller should I use for ceiling and for the walls to get the 'orange peel' effect?

Thanks again
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by A. Spruce » Tue Oct 30, 2018 5:59 pm

Yep, hot mud fires quickly on ya if you're not careful with it. I use 20 minute hot mud for most of my work that requires speed. It's mostly in the mixing, as it's the amount of water you add that will affect how quickly it fires off on you. The wetter it is, the longer working time you have. RESIST the urge to scrape old mud back into your pan, all that does is dry out the pan faster and create lumps. Apply and work the material until you have it where you want THEN scrap the knife off on the outside of the pan before going back in for more material.

1 - Once I have the surface completely finished, I will let it go 24 to 48 hours before another final sand (spot sanding as necessary), then I will prime. How long you wait really depends on drying conditions, it sounds like your walls dried off pretty quickly and that you've had good air flow the whole time. 24 hours is probably sufficient.

2 - I don't know that I've ever used BE Plus, what's the label say that makes it different from regular BE? With fresh drywall you actually kind of want a watery primer, as this helps it absorb and bond into the surface. Regular BE is perfectly fine as a first primer. I'd guess that BE Plus is probably a little thicker and may have better stain coverage, hard to say without comparing labels.

3 - It's a little more work, but you will have far better results if you skim out the entire wall, rather than trying to match old texture. If your walls never had actual texture, what you're seeing is probably the results of years worth of paint roller marks. Rolling on paint leaves tiny bumps that get bigger with each new coat of paint. If this is what you have, thin out some topping mud and roll that on, this will mimic paint texture and blend new into old. If you have blown texture, then blowing on new is the only way you'll recreate the same look and feel. Rolled on texture is easy, blown texture is extremely hard to replicate if you do not have the equipment. It can be approximated with the hand pump guns that I've referenced before, but still no substitute for the real deal.

4 - Primer is NOT paint, do not use it as a replacement for a good quality top coat, especially in a high moisture environment like a bathroom. Two coats of primer to seal and even out the walls, then two coats of a good quality semi-gloss paint for even coverage and complete seal of the wall against the moisture. Paint is cheap and easy, repairing damaged drywall, as you have found out, is a major pain in the arse.

5 - With rare exception, a standard 3/8" nap roller is all I ever use. It will work for the above texturing technique I mentioned and it will work for applying paint to smooth surfaces. Thicker nap rollers are needed for heavy textured surfaces, something you don't have.
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by DPFAST » Tue Oct 30, 2018 6:38 pm

A. Spruce wrote:
Tue Oct 30, 2018 5:59 pm
.... RESIST the urge to scrape old mud back into your pan, all that does is dry out the pan faster and create lumps. Apply and work the material until you have it where you want THEN scrap the knife off on the outside of the pan before going back in for more material.

You are sooo right about that. This happened to me several times and I had to start from scratch. Also, a big NoNo, is using a plastic mud pan. Man i got that as a set from a HD and after working for few seconds I noticed some small strings on the wall sticking out of the mud. They were small plastic strings my stainless steel mud knife were snatching each time I grabbed a new mud out of the pan. These knives are very sharp especially the corners. Using stainless steel mud pans is a must.

I don't know that I've ever used BE Plus, what's the label say that makes it different from regular BE? With fresh drywall you actually kind of want a watery primer, as this helps it absorb and bond into the surface. Regular BE is perfectly fine as a first primer. I'd guess that BE Plus is probably a little thicker and may have better stain coverage, hard to say without comparing labels.

Not sure. But its little more expensive $24 for a gallon vs. $16 for the regular. I've got the Plus just in case. I read somewhere that the Plus can be use as primer for a oil based paints as well. See the pic...
20181030_191130.jpg
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It's a little more work, but you will have far better results if you skim out the entire wall, rather than trying to match old texture. If your walls never had actual texture, what you're seeing is probably the results of years worth of paint roller marks. Rolling on paint leaves tiny bumps that get bigger with each new coat of paint. If this is what you have, thin out some topping mud and roll that on, this will mimic paint texture and blend new into old. If you have blown texture, then blowing on new is the only way you'll recreate the same look and feel. Rolled on texture is easy, blown texture is extremely hard to replicate if you do not have the equipment. It can be approximated with the hand pump guns that I've referenced before, but still no substitute for the real deal.

I am sure you are right on that. I just wanna finish this painting project asap and move on the the plumbing that I will try to roll on the primer and the paint to cover best I can. Hopefully sending the whole surface including the current painted one will help. I was just thinking that using a roller with longer fibers may create more aggressive surface and look more even throughout. I just know that skimming the whole wall, I will definitely screw something up again and will have to keep fixing it for another week. I just don't wanna spend anymore time on this if I can

Primer is NOT paint, do not use it as a replacement for a good quality top coat, especially in a high moisture environment like a bathroom. Two coats of primer to seal and even out the walls, then two coats of a good quality semi-gloss paint for even coverage and complete seal of the wall against the moisture. Paint is cheap and easy, repairing damaged drywall, as you have found out, is a major pain in the arse.

Thanks for this advice. Can I paint half the ceiling first and second half later on?

With rare exception, a standard 3/8" nap roller is all I ever use. It will work for the above texturing technique I mentioned and it will work for applying paint to smooth surfaces. Thicker nap rollers are needed for heavy textured surfaces, something you don't have.

Polyester, microfiber or woven something. What should I choose?

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A. Spruce
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Re: Fixing a drywall for newbies, please help

Post by A. Spruce » Tue Oct 30, 2018 9:20 pm

Paint the ceiling in one shot, if you stop in the middle you'll have a dry edge that will show up later. If you can't do the whole ceiling in one go, then wait until you can. You can prime and paint at different times, but whatever you're using in the moment, do the entire area.

To be honest, I buy the cheapest rollers I can find, so they're probably polyester. The only time I've worried about what type of applicator to use is when the material specifies or requires a special type of applicator, say in the case of lacquer or polyurethane. For latex paints, polyester is just fine, which means the cheapest roller you can find will suffice. The ONE thing that you should always do is rinse out the roller really well before using it. The nap is full of lint from the manufacturing process, if you don't wash it out, you will have furry walls. Rinse it really good with a garden hose, then use the hose to spin the roller as fast as you can to wring it dry. Now you're ready to paint with it.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

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