framing duct work

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lynnb
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Joined: Mon Oct 14, 2013 12:50 pm

framing duct work

Post by lynnb » Sun Feb 23, 2014 9:52 pm

Hi I'm back with another project I need to tackle. In the old laundry room I want to install suspended ceiling. The room is about 10x20feet or so. I need to first box in furnace duct work that goes the length of the room. What would be the simplest way to frame this in and finish it off so I can then tackle the suspended ceiling.I added in some photos of the room I'm getting cleared out.
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Thanks
Lynn

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Shannon
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Re: framing duct work

Post by Shannon » Mon Feb 24, 2014 6:47 am

The bets way is to cut some wood 2x2s and create a frame work around both duct that will create one bulkhead around both ducts since they are basically side by side. Check the levelness of the duct work and find the point that is closer to the floor, at that location mark a line on the wall 2" lower than the lowest duct. This will be the elevation of the bottom of the frame work. Mark a level line from there right across the wall and screw a 2x2 to the wall above that line all the way along. Now level a line across the end walls to 3" past the 2nd duct work pipe from the bottom of the 2x2 you installed. Make this measurement the same distance at both ends from the wall you installed the 2x2 and mark a point. At that point measure up 1-1/2" on the wall and make another point. At those two higher points install a nail or screw that you can attach a string . This string can be pulled tight and used as a guide for the height and alignment of some vertical 2x2s that will hang from the floor joists to create the stud work for the outer wall of the bulkhead. So now by using a level along that string at every second floor joist you can plumb a line up from the string and mark a plumb line on the side of those joists. Those lines will be the guild for installing each stud. Measure down from the bottom of the sub floor to the string and cut each stud and install them in place. Now you can cut and install another 2x2 to the bottom of those studs to create the other horizontal corner of the bulkhead.
Finally cut the horizontal bottom studs (2x2) that will fit between the 2x2 on the wall and the 2x2 you suspended from the vertical studs, install these at 16" apart. You should now have a skeleton to hang drywall on and finish your bullhead.
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lynnb
Posts: 40
Joined: Mon Oct 14, 2013 12:50 pm

Re: framing duct work

Post by lynnb » Mon Feb 24, 2014 12:51 pm

Thanks Shannon, just did a premeasure and above the door to the lowest duct work which is the heat and the one against the wall, it is 3.5 inches to the top edge of the door with door opened, will this be an issue?
Would I be any further ahead if I used 1x4's for the horizontal cross pieces to maximize the height from floor? Also am I understanding correctly that I should screw the 2x2 to the wall the entire length of the ductwork then build two sets of verticle cribbing,one for the shorter and one set for the longer or one very long one ( split in two)? then attach horizontals from the bottom of cribs to the wall at the 2x2?
If there is an alternative to drywall I'd like to here it as well Shannon, something thats not so messy to finish.
Thanks
Lynn

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Shannon
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Re: framing duct work

Post by Shannon » Mon Feb 24, 2014 3:55 pm

Either 2x2 or 1x4 will work but with the 1x4 version you will need another support structure between the two ducts to help it from sagging over time. With the 2x2 version and 1/2" drywall you should end up with 1" clearance over the door and with the 1x4 version you should get about 1-3/4". Drywall is really the best option however you could use 1/4" paneling if you wanted, I see thats what is on the walls now. I have posted a couple of drawings that may help with your other questions. If they do not just come back to me with the questions you still have.
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lynnb
Posts: 40
Joined: Mon Oct 14, 2013 12:50 pm

Re: framing duct work

Post by lynnb » Mon Feb 24, 2014 3:59 pm

Thanks Shannon your the man.

lynnb
Posts: 40
Joined: Mon Oct 14, 2013 12:50 pm

Re: framing duct work

Post by lynnb » Fri Feb 28, 2014 2:18 am

Hi Shannon I ended up going with 1x4 and using hardboard, I think it went pretty good.
Now what I would like to do is a suspended ceiling. I neasured around as pper one of your videos and marked up with a level the lowest point which is about 4 inch and a bitmore than 4 inch on theeast wall as per level.
I've come across 3 snags or bumps in the road, the fuse panel , the higher than projected level of dropped ceiling for basement window and heating vent being a bit higher than suspended ceiling.
I'm thinking for fuse panel to build out from the wall a box or framing so I can install a door and at its highest point make a point where dropped ceiling would meet the box or framing attach a L bracket for dropped ceiling rail and for window, well not quie sure, maybe somehow box in the upper of window and angle ceiling upward to an L bracket rail. As for heating vent maybe just use L bracket and go up higher than normal height then across width of vent opening and back down to normal level. Any thoughts Shannon? Ideas?
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Lynn

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Shannon
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Re: framing duct work

Post by Shannon » Fri Feb 28, 2014 7:17 am

For the panel building a cabinet to close it in is good idea. Across top face of cabinet leave a flat piece so the ceiling can but to it ,and install door below that. The window I would build a small valance out of 3/4" MDF basically it would have a top,two ends and a face. Build it so when it is screwed to the floor joists above the window that its ends and face protrude down low enough that the ceiling will butt into it. When designing that consider how a curtain rod can fit into it incase you want curtains or blinds in after. For the vent either remove the" boot" end that the rectangular vent cover would fit to and install some flexible round ducting that will reach the ceiling and go with a round vent cover or build an extension out of tin or MDF to fit the existing rectangular end that will reach the ceiling after.
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