drywall mud talk

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Shannon
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drywall mud talk

Post by Shannon » Mon Jun 12, 2017 10:00 pm

A. Spruce wrote:Problem is, those fixtures are too close together and the cable isn't stapled within 6" of the boxes! :shock: ;) ;) ;) ;) ;) Oh, come on, Shannon, you knew I was gonna tease ya just a little! :mrgreen:
In all honesty I think I even mentioned in the video that the video was not about the proper stapling and such cause I knew some OCD person would complain for sure...ooops I did not mean you :lol:

Serious question though, watching the drywall patch around electrical box vid, you don't 1st coat tape in the same motion as setting/bedding the tape? How come? The only time I've not really been able to tape and first coat is if the hole being patched is rather large and doesn't support the tape well, then I'll let things dry first, otherwise, tape and 1st coat go on at the same time.
On a smaller job I may first coat after taping is completed, but many times on the small jobs I will hang the board, tape and do corner bead in one day so it just works out that my coating is next day. Since I work by myself bigger jobs just work out that way also, get the taping and bead work done then start the coating. In the particular case of the video my experience is that a hole that size needs to dry before I apply second coat or it sags out and needs more work after to cover.
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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by A. Spruce » Mon Jun 12, 2017 10:21 pm

Shannon wrote:On a smaller job I may first coat after taping is completed, but many times on the small jobs I will hang the board, tape and do corner bead in one day so it just works out that my coating is next day. Since I work by myself bigger jobs just work out that way also, get the taping and bead work done then start the coating. In the particular case of the video my experience is that a hole that size needs to dry before I apply second coat or it sags out and needs more work after to cover.
Hmm. I've always had everything done beforehand, so all I have to do is focus on throwing mud on the wall. Corners only get one side 1st coated and allowed to dry before doing the other side of the joint, which prevents gouging into the first side, if that makes sense. This was something my drywall guy showed me. Two other major tips were to put a slight bow in my knives, which helps mud distribution, and to use thinned topping mud as texture, which is a whole lot easier than using dry mix texture.
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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by Aaron » Mon Jun 12, 2017 10:50 pm

I've seen Topping Compound, but at my usual home center it only comes in the 5 gallon pails, so I never thought to buy it because I never really knew what it was and didn't want to commit to 5 gallons of it. All-purpose and lightweight each come in 5 gallon pails, boxes, and small containers.

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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by A. Spruce » Mon Jun 12, 2017 11:37 pm

Joint compound has hardeners in it that make it really good for taping and first coat stuff. Because of those hardeners, it is difficult to sand, which makes it less than ideal for subsequent and final coats. Lightweight, and multi-purpose are a combination of joint and topping compounds, kind of a happy medium between the useful properties of both. Topping compound is a smooth, creamy consistency that remains relatively soft, so it's easy to work and super easy to sand, making it ideal for final finishing and texturing.

The difference between using dry mix texture and topping compound for texture is that dry mix is kind of "foamy" in consistency so it dries very quickly, allowing for knocking down much more quickly than if you use thinned topping. What I've found, however, is that having some extra time between squirting and knock-down usually isn't a bad thing, and it's much easier to get smooth, non-clumpy material to squirt with topping mud.

As for container size, buckets are around 5 gallons, boxes are about 4 gallons, and I'm not sure I've seen smaller containers of premix. When I was active, I'd buy a bucket every once in a while as needed for the marked container, and refill it with boxes that were slightly cheaper. Buckets seal nicely, keeping crusties at bay, whereas once you open a box, you immediately start getting crusty chunks dropping into it.

If you don't need much in any one serving, then it doesn't make sense to buy premix, at least not in large quantities. For this there is dry mix, which comes in different curing times and some that are sandable once cured. I prefer these for patch work because I can complete the entire 3 coat process in less than a day, whereas premix takes hours to dry between coats.

This sounds like a good video for Shannon to cover more fully. :P :mrgreen:
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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by Aaron » Tue Jun 13, 2017 12:57 am

A. Spruce wrote:As for container size, buckets are around 5 gallons, boxes are about 4 gallons, and I'm not sure I've seen smaller containers of premix.
Yeah the pre-mix comes in one gallon pails at my home center too. Obviously the cost is much higher for that convenient size, but it's a nice option for very small repair projects.
A. Spruce wrote:When I was active, I'd buy a bucket every once in a while as needed for the marked container, and refill it with boxes that were slightly cheaper. Buckets seal nicely, keeping crusties at bay, whereas once you open a box, you immediately start getting crusty chunks dropping into it.
Yeah I did this when I remodeled my kitchen. Got the pail first, then filled it with a box.

Another thing to do is to cut a piece of plastic food wrap film and press that directly on the surface of the mud before you seal up the lid of the bucket. That keeps it even more sealed from drying out.
A. Spruce wrote:If you don't need much in any one serving, then it doesn't make sense to buy premix, at least not in large quantities. For this there is dry mix, which comes in different curing times and some that are sandable once cured. I prefer these for patch work because I can complete the entire 3 coat process in less than a day, whereas premix takes hours to dry between coats.
Yeah the dry mix is very convenient. I really like the Durabond for its strength. I use it for initial coats that fill gaps being very careful to knife it flat while it's still wet, because it's nearly impossible to sand after. I've even added silica sand to the Durabond to bulk it up even more when I fill larger gaps.

But I tend to like to do finish coats with pre-mix, as I like to take my time and not feel rushed to use what I've mixed before it tightens up and needs to get thrown out.
A. Spruce wrote:This sounds like a good video for Shannon to cover more fully. :P :mrgreen:
Not a bad idea, really... Mixing the dry stuff is sort of intimidating, especially because the clock is ticking. It's sort of hard to make just the right amount you need. Takes practice to gauge the mix and water ratios.

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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by A. Spruce » Tue Jun 13, 2017 1:20 am

Every time I dip mud out of the bucket, I smooth clean the sides of the bucket and surface so no dried chunks can form. This is important when it's warm/hot out, when it's cool, it isn't much of a problem and bucket cleanup can wait until end of day. With the lid on tight, mud will last months, any moisture loss will condense inside the bucket and return to the surface. Worst thing that happens is you peel a bit of stiff mud from the top of the bucket before using again, stuff that's too dry to mix in. If you know it will be a while before next use, simply put an inch of water over the top of the mud, this will prevent it from drying out. At next use, simply pour off the water really good and whip the mud until smooth and creamy, then you're good to go again. If the mud gets an odor or obvious mold, it is time to toss and buy new.

Yeah, the dry mix can be tricky to finish with, but not impossible in a pinch. Each coat needs to be as smooth as possible, and you thin the mud down a bit runnier than normal to give you both more working time and a smoother product to work with. I've even textured small patch areas with quick set dry mix. Drying time can be sped up with a fan or hair dryer, just don't let the wife know you borrowed her favorite hair dryer to finish your drywall project! :shock: :lol: Other tricks with quick set is that you can control drying time with both quantity and temperature of the mixing water. Hot water and a stiff mix can fire off in your pan before you get it on the wall. Cold water and a soupy mix will make 20 minute mud stay wet for an hour.

As I recall, with dry mix texture, you mix it and let it sit for 15 - 20 minutes to fully hydrate, give it another quick mix, then squirt. Like anything else, once you use it a few times you know how much water it takes and what the consistency should be. The one thing I usually had trouble with was clumping, which does not help things in the slightest. There was always a chunk that would get stuck in the bottom of the bucket and cause all kinds of problems once the spraying started. This was one of the biggest reasons I switched to using premix topping compound for texture, that, and I didn't have to carry around yet another product and even more buckets to deal with it.
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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by Shannon » Tue Jun 13, 2017 8:17 am

A. Spruce wrote: Hmm. I've always had everything done beforehand, so all I have to do is focus on throwing mud on the wall. Corners only get one side 1st coated and allowed to dry before doing the other side of the joint, which prevents gouging into the first side, if that makes sense. This was something my drywall guy showed me. Two other major tips were to put a slight bow in my knives, which helps mud distribution, and to use thinned topping mud as texture, which is a whole lot easier than using dry mix texture.
Yes I would agree inside corners I only coat once and one side /day or whatever it takes so they are completely dry before doing second side. I figured that out on my own after having to mess around a few times fixing gouges and even trying to use a corner trowel ( which i found really does not work well). I use a combos of knives and trowels, my knifes are all flat/straight but i have a curved trowel that is great for building a little more over butts on first coat. I agree thinned mud for texture is just fine, I really think that is all texture mud is but in a different box??
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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by Shannon » Tue Jun 13, 2017 8:26 am

I buy boxes mostly and pails sometimes. If i have a small job that does not need that much and it will be a while before I need mud again I buy a pail and do not mix water into the pail. I will mix in another pail or right in my hand held pan. You get that sour mouldy smell in mud that has sat stored to long after being mixed with water.
Keeping your pail sides clean during use is a for sure must to keep the dry chunkys out of your good mud. Also keeping mud down away from the lid of the pail so it does not get in the lip of the lid,dry out and then fall in the pail when you are putting it on.
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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by Aaron » Tue Jun 13, 2017 11:53 am

I just thought of a good idea. One of your mudding tools should be a cheap rubber spatula. Use this kitchen tool to scoop mud from the pail into your hand-held trough. Then you can always scrape the sides of the round pail nice and cleanly; you just can't do that with a rigid trowel.

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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by A. Spruce » Tue Jun 13, 2017 12:21 pm

Aaron wrote:I just thought of a good idea. One of your mudding tools should be a cheap rubber spatula. Use this kitchen tool to scoop mud from the pail into your hand-held trough. Then you can always scrape the sides of the round pail nice and cleanly; you just can't do that with a rigid trowel.
A 6" knife works for that just fine. Scoop out what you need, smooth the top, scrape the sides, and you're good to go. A fine film left on the sides will stay there, chunks are what get broken off and pollute the mud. Occasionally, I'll run a rag around the rim of the bucket and down the inside, though this is mostly an end of job task before the mud goes back into inventory. I do have spatulas and rubber scrapers in my paint equipment box for cleaning out paint cans, though. 8-)

Shannon is right about adding water and mold/smell. What I normally do is leave the mud virgin and thin it in the pan as it's used, unless the job is large enough to use the whole batch, then it will get thinned in the bucket.
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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by Aaron » Tue Jun 13, 2017 2:43 pm

A. Spruce wrote:Shannon is right about adding water and mold/smell. What I normally do is leave the mud virgin and thin it in the pan as it's used, unless the job is large enough to use the whole batch, then it will get thinned in the bucket.
And for that you'd use a large paint stirrer on a drill.

So if you can take all-purpose or light-purpose mud and thin it out, why would you buy Topping Compound? Is there more to it than just "thinned-out mud"?

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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by emtnut » Tue Jun 13, 2017 2:52 pm

Since we're on the topic ... My daughter is interested in a house. The shower in the master bedroom is leaking ... Dad can fix that ;) ... well Dad is probably gutting the whole room :o

Below in the living room, some of the stippled drywall got wet.
I figured I'd remove at least one sheet to fix (see what I'm into if she actually does low-ball bid the place)

What do you guys think of reinstating the stipple. I'd bring someone in, but can they match say a 8x12 area with the rest of the room ? I could paint everything after, just wondering if it would look uniform.
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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by A. Spruce » Tue Jun 13, 2017 3:03 pm

Aaron wrote:
A. Spruce wrote:Shannon is right about adding water and mold/smell. What I normally do is leave the mud virgin and thin it in the pan as it's used, unless the job is large enough to use the whole batch, then it will get thinned in the bucket.
And for that you'd use a large paint stirrer on a drill.

So if you can take all-purpose or light-purpose mud and thin it out, why would you buy Topping Compound? Is there more to it than just "thinned-out mud"?
Actually, I have a mixing paddle made for drywall and masonry products, chuck that into the 1/2" drill with side handle and let'r rip.

As I said earlier, all purpose and lightweight are a happy medium between joint and topping compounds. They do not dry as hard as joint, so they're easier to sand, but they're still much harder than topping, so not as easy to sand and finish as topping is.
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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by Aaron » Tue Jun 13, 2017 3:12 pm

A. Spruce wrote:Actually, I have a mixing paddle made for drywall and masonry products, chuck that into the 1/2" drill with side handle and let'r rip.

Oh that's right, that's a different thing, more like a paddle. I don't have one of those; I've just used my paint stirrer with mud.
A. Spruce wrote:As I said earlier, all purpose and lightweight are a happy medium between joint and topping compounds. They do not dry as hard as joint, so they're easier to sand, but they're still much harder than topping, so not as easy to sand and finish as topping is.
Do you ever add water to the Topping or is it thin enough straight from the bucket?

It's hard to understand why you'd use one over another. I guess the idea is you use all-purpose for taping, lightweight for the 2nd coat, and Topping for the last coat?

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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by Aaron » Tue Jun 13, 2017 3:16 pm

emtnut wrote:Below in the living room, some of the stippled drywall got wet.
I figured I'd remove at least one sheet to fix (see what I'm into if she actually does low-ball bid the place)

What do you guys think of reinstating the stipple. I'd bring someone in, but can they match say a 8x12 area with the rest of the room ? I could paint everything after, just wondering if it would look uniform.
My house has stipple all over the walls, and I'm not a fan of it at all. I much prefer a smooth walls and ceilings over textures.

Having said that, I closed off door and shrunk a large opening, and I tried my best to copy the look of the stipple. You can definitely tell where my work begins and ends. I have no idea how it's done.

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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by A. Spruce » Tue Jun 13, 2017 3:21 pm

If you're gutting the bathroom, then do all the work from the top, leave the ceiling alone. If it's only a bit of water stain, you can seal that easily enough and repaint, save yourself the hassles of trying to match texture. Even fixing a little minor damage will be nothing in comparison to a large 8x12 area.

If you do go the route of pulling the ceiling, then an experienced drywall guy should be able to match the stipple with relative ease. You won't get an exact match, but probably close enough that nobody will notice. If you're patient enough and have some experience with drywall, you could probably stipple it yourself. To match stippling, it takes a combination of mud viscosity, "tool", and technique.

Mud applies differently, depending on whether it is runny or thick. "Tools" can range from sponges, brushes, rollers, wadded newspaper or plastic bags, etc. Technique is whether to just dab or to dab and twist at the same time? Once you get that figured out, then you have to look for obvious application patterns, streaks, straight lines, arcs, swirl patterns, etc. When you bring all this together, you then might achieve a similar pattern to the existing.

In the end, it would probably be a lot easier and better end product to simply float everything smooth and retexture. IMHO, fads, like stippled texture, date homes very very quickly. I prefer to stick with the classics of either orange peel, knock-down, or acoustic. All three of these are relatively easy to match, should patch work be necessary at any point down the road.
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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by A. Spruce » Tue Jun 13, 2017 3:34 pm

Aaron wrote:Oh that's right, that's a different thing, more like a paddle. I don't have one of those; I've just used my paint stirrer with mud.
I've used a 5 gallon paint whip too, it's just a lot smaller so it takes longer and doesn't do as good a job as a paddle does. Ain't no harm in using what you've got. 8-)
Aaron wrote:Do you ever add water to the Topping or is it thin enough straight from the bucket?
I usually add water to everything to make it more workable, it just depends on how much I have to do as to whether I add water to the bucket or the pan. It's really a matter of personal preference and what you're looking to achieve, sometimes thick mud is preferable, sometimes not.
Aaron wrote:It's hard to understand why you'd use one over another. I guess the idea is you use all-purpose for taping, lightweight for the 2nd coat, and Topping for the last coat?
I use joint and topping only. Joint is for tape and first coat, which I do in the same motion. Topping is used for all subsequent coats. The only time I've used anything else is when what I normally use is not available. In my experience, multi-purpose and lightweight handle differently than topping, and they do not sand as easily. I am a proponent of sanding, not heavily, but certainly enough to feather everything in. The hand can feel things that the eye cannot see, so if you run your hand across your work, you'll feel every defect and can assess whether that area needs more mud or more sanding. Once this is done, you will have a perfect wall that will make even the most finicky of customer happy. :mrgreen:
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Re: drywall mud talk

Post by Aaron » Tue Jun 13, 2017 8:35 pm

Interesting that you talk about ease of sanding cause I never thought pre-mix of any variety was hard to sand. Same goes for setting-type dry mix: very easy to sand. Durabond is impossible. Lol

Have you tried wet sanding per chance? I don't hear much about this technique anymore, it might have been a fad.

I an know-enough-to-be-dangerous when it comes to wall finishing. So I am pretty overkill, I've like to apply two coats of primer. I do *not* trust "paint and primer in one" paint. Unless maybe it's Benjamin Moore or Sherwin-Williams. I will still do a primer coat first. lol

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Re: drywall mud talk

Post by A. Spruce » Tue Jun 13, 2017 10:06 pm

Maybe that mid-western mud isn't as tenacious as west coast mud? :lol: I don't pay that close of attention to product brand, unless I've had nothing but crap luck with it. By and large, I think that I've used mostly USG products, which is a biggie in the drywall industry. Back when Lumberjack and its affiliates were around, I never had to worry about product quality, now that Lowe's and Evil Orange are about the only game in town, it's whatever they decide to stock on any given day, it might be USG one day and China's finest the next.

Yes, I've wet sanded, IMHO, it is not as controllable as dry sanding, and you can't feather as well with wet. If I'm in a situation where dust control is important, I'll either wet sand or skip sanding altogether, because when forced, my knife skills are good enough that I can get by without sanding. I don't think that wet sanding is a fad, it's just not as easy, fast, or effective as dry, so anyone in the biz is going to go with dry or not at all. There are sanding systems that you can hook to your shop vac to minimize the dust, somewhat, if you're so inclined. What I tend to do is simply tape cheap blue mesh furnace filters to a box fan, this removes a great deal of the dust in the air. When the filters plug, you simply bang them out on the floor and sweep up, or blow them out outside. This tip works well for any kind of dust control in an enclosed environment.

When it comes to painting, there is no replacement for doing things the right way, and that is primer first and paint second. I too do two coats of primer on fresh drywall, followed by two coats of paint. It goes without saying that I stick to good quality products from reputable names. The only name brand I will not use is Behr. Some people swear by it, I swear AT it! :mrgreen: I stick to dealer brands, not Big Box favorites. 8-)
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Re: drywall mud talk

Post by A. Spruce » Tue Jun 13, 2017 10:11 pm

On the topic of drywall and paint, whenever patching, it is necessary to prime the patch, then prime the entire wall or ceiling that you're working on before painting. This does two things. It seals the raw drywall and creates a uniform surface for the paint. Additionally, no matter how good your paint guy is, you're not going to get a perfect match between brand new, out of the can, paint and something that's been on the wall for several years. Even if you use paint from the same can the wall was painted with originally, the color will be different because the old paint will be worn, dirty, and faded, hence, prime everything and repaint everything.

If you do only paint a small area, hopefully you have corners nearby that will hide some of the disparity of color and sheen. 8-)
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Re: drywall mud talk

Post by Aaron » Tue Jun 13, 2017 10:32 pm

My Menards tends to stock USG or National Gypsum products. One time they had LaFarge. Not sure what the difference is. They seem all the same to me.

Yeah I try to avoid sanding as much as possible. It absolutely sucks.

The thing about wet sanding is dust control. But according to you that comes at a cost of lost of efficacy. That makes sense.

So if you put a mesh filter behind a fan blowing outside, what benefit is that versus just a fan without a filter? You want to get the dust outside, so wouldn't a filter impede that? It sounds plausible to use a filter, I just don't understand why you want to protect the outdoors from drywall dust.

Agreed about the primer + two top coats. That is what I was raised with. If you're covering a dark color you want to prime until it's white again, then proceed to the new topcoat color.

I too do two coats of primer on fresh drywall, followed by two coatsp of paint. Zinsser 1-2-3 latex primer seems good enough where you could get by with one coat. But economy primer should be two coats for sure.

I too am not a fan of Behr. I think that paint is too thick. You definitely need to add some Floetrol to thin it out.

I think multiple coats of low-cost latex paint looks great! As they say, multiple thin coats are better than fewer thick coats.

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Re: drywall mud talk

Post by Aaron » Tue Jun 13, 2017 10:45 pm

On your comment about touch ups on patches and such, I've had the opposite experience. I've filled in some holes in the wall with spackle (I use Zinsser Ready-Patch), then prime and touch up.

I use leftover paint that I had from the original paint and I'm amazed how my patch disappears. Absolutely indiscernable even years later. I've had pretty good luck in this area.

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Re: drywall mud talk

Post by A. Spruce » Tue Jun 13, 2017 11:35 pm

Next time you do some drywall, experiment with wet and dry sanding for yourself, see which you like better. What is going to make the biggest difference is improving your knife skills so that any sort of sanding is minimized. If you take your time and get each coat on as smooth as possible, by the end there should be little sanding to do, other than maybe feather things here and there, depending on what you're doing.

No, you use the fan/filter combo in an enclosed space to reduce the ambient dust level. You want two filters, one front and one on the back, and they have to be the same size as the fan to be of much value. You can also blow the dust out a window, but this can cause two additional problems, intake air into the space may be limited by tarping, and blowing a cloud of drywall dust at the neighbor doesn't make for good neighbor relations, no matter how much you tell them that gypsum is beneficial to plants. :lol:

Yes, the new drywall needs two coats of primer to seal and cover well. If you're patching into an existing painted wall, then you need to give the wall at least one coat of primer to seal in the dust and dirt and create a uniform surface, otherwise you'll have a sheen difference between the new drywall and the old painted surface.

When drastically changing colors in either direction (light or dark ), it actually works better to tint your primer towards the new paint color, this way the primer will blend with the new paint, rather than leaving white streaks shining through the new paint.

Bull's Eye 123 is my primer of choice as well. In my working days, Kelly Moore was my dealer paint dealer and even they recommended BE123 over their own brand, saying that it was identical in performance at half the cost. I don't like messing around with paint, it is a tedious and crappy job, so I want it done right the first time. For this reason I stick to products I know will do the job and leave the cheap stuff on the shelf.

My experiences with Behr products, all of them, is that they don't cover, they don't cure, they spatter during application, and overall are a pain in the butt to use. I've been conned into using them on numerous occasions through the years and the experience is always the same, simply poor quality in every way. Now, my good buddy MasterCarpentry would say otherwise, he loves the stuff, as do other pros that I hold in high regard. I've heard nothing but praise for Behr's new paint+primer in one. I won't use it, and here's why; I've never had a failure with Kelly Moore or other dealer brands, but have had plenty of headaches with everything that bears the Behr label. It simply isn't worth the risk.

IMHO, cost and quality are in the eyes of the beholder. I have very high standards, so I only use products that are going to perform to my expectation. 8-)
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Re: drywall mud talk

Post by A. Spruce » Tue Jun 13, 2017 11:41 pm

Aaron wrote:On your comment about touch ups on patches and such, I've had the opposite experience. I've filled in some holes in the wall with spackle (I use Zinsser Ready-Patch), then prime and touch up.

I use leftover paint that I had from the original paint and I'm amazed how my patch disappears. Absolutely indiscernable even years later. I've had pretty good luck in this area.
It depends on what you're doing, what you can get away with. I never said that spackle couldn't be used to fill a hole, that's what it's made for, but I wouldn't use it as a finishing product. We may have differing ideas of what spackle is, or possibly regional differences, who knows. We'd have to be standing side by side with our products of choice in hand to really know. :mrgreen:

Whether original paint can color will blend into a wall will have everything to do with how old, dirty, and faded the wall is. I agree, it is possible to use original paint to touch up spots without it being noticeable, and it's great when this happens. The best thing about having original paint is being able to buy more of it as needed because you know the brand and can color match if necessary. 8-)
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Aaron
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Re: drywall mud talk

Post by Aaron » Tue Jun 13, 2017 11:58 pm

Zinsser Ready-Patch is an unusual spackle, it has some alkyd solvent in it. I use it for patching holes in finished walls. It comes in half-pint through gallon pails, but I just use tiny amounts at a time.

Yeah in terms of paint and colors, I keep it super simple. I really like just off white or antique white with white moulding. The interior decoration is all about framed art you hang on the wall, not some funky paint color.

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Re: drywall mud talk

Post by A. Spruce » Wed Jun 14, 2017 12:07 am

Yep, keep the big things classic and neutral. If you want color, do that with drapes and decorations. 8-)
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Re: drywall mud talk

Post by A. Spruce » Wed Jun 14, 2017 12:12 am

The spackle I'm familiar with is Dap painter's spackle, which is kind of like wet foam. Great for nail holes, but not much else.

If that stuff you're using is a solvent type, I can see where you might get a little more mileage out of it.
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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by emtnut » Wed Jun 14, 2017 6:35 am

A. Spruce wrote:If you're gutting the bathroom, then do all the work from the top, leave the ceiling alone. If it's only a bit of water stain, you can seal that easily enough and repaint, save yourself the hassles of trying to match texture. Even fixing a little minor damage will be nothing in comparison to a large 8x12 area.
I would do the bathroom all from the top. If it comes down to a leaky pipe under the floor, I'll either lift part of the floor or possibly do it from underneath.

The ceiling is actually 'popcorn' ... that blown in stuff (I always called that stipple :oops: )
There looks to be about a 2' x 2' section that is wet. I touched it in the middle, and my finger went right through it ! I'm thinking it would be best to replace part, or the whole sheet.

Now that I have the right term, how well can they match that blown in popcorn, stipply crap !
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Re: drywall mud talk

Post by Shannon » Wed Jun 14, 2017 7:31 am

Well I have never tried to wet sand, my mudding skills are pretty good and dry sanding is minimal usually. I like a box fan in the window if I can unless that window looks out over someone else or a deck or something outside. I can't say I have ever seen a cloud of dust out the window so as long as there is 5-6 feet between houses I never worry about it much, its just I do not want to have something outside that needs cleaning after wards as well.I honestly use all purpose mud a lot, but have started doing taping mud to tape when it justifies buying a box. I tried that dustless mud for final coat once and it was not fun to sand so never again.
As for paint you guys have heard me say it before here and I know Sprucy does not like the idea but I almost exclusively use Ben Moore Aura, its one of those paint/primer in one products. It covers great and I do a lot of basements and bathrooms and have never had an issue with adhesion .Two coats covers perfectly for pretty much any colour and going back even a couple months later for a small fix up you can spot paint with a roller and never see it once it dries. It does dry pretty fast (they say an hour) so sometimes i will use a retarder in the paint to slow that if the conditions are drying to fast. If you are rolling with out retarder and see a spot a few strokes back you wanna hit again... forget it. Get it on the second coat.About the only place I use primers is to cover old stains or that kind of thing.
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Re: Aaron and I are toast

Post by A. Spruce » Wed Jun 14, 2017 12:34 pm

emtnut wrote:I would do the bathroom all from the top. If it comes down to a leaky pipe under the floor, I'll either lift part of the floor or possibly do it from underneath.

The ceiling is actually 'popcorn' ... that blown in stuff (I always called that stipple :oops: )
There looks to be about a 2' x 2' section that is wet. I touched it in the middle, and my finger went right through it ! I'm thinking it would be best to replace part, or the whole sheet.

Now that I have the right term, how well can they match that blown in popcorn, stipply crap !
Well, THERE'S your problem! :lol: Yes, popcorn can easily and successfully be patched or blended back into old. You've got basically a few choices here:
1 - Spray patch to match and walk away.
2 - Spray to match, then respray the whole ceiling.
3 - Scrape entire ceiling and respray.
4 - Spray patch, let dry, then paint ceiling to match color of new (shiny white ) and old (dirty, dingy )

Depending on how dirty the ceiling is, I usually opt for #2 or #3, as this is faster than painting, considering the walls and floor are already tarped to spray the patch.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

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