Moving a door's strike plate right next to its old screw hole

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garyb
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Joined: Fri Mar 24, 2017 12:42 pm

Moving a door's strike plate right next to its old screw hole

Post by garyb » Wed Dec 20, 2017 8:55 pm

Hi all,

I need to move my door's strike plate a bit, but I'm worried if I drill a pilot hole so close to the "old" hole it'll crack and become one giant double-hole, with the screw wiggling around in there.

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I think I remember seeing a method where you cram wood glue and toothpicks into the "old" screw hole, but should I wait 24 hrs and _then_ drill the new pilot hole?

I also made a little wood plug for the top of the hole that catches the latch, in case the new top pilot hole is too far down and it cracks. But what can I use to keep that plug pushed up at the top of the latch hole until the glue dries tomorrow? I was thinking of just shoving a tissue in there or something, but I'm sure there's a better answer. :D

Thanks!

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A. Spruce
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Re: Moving a door's strike plate right next to its old screw hole

Post by A. Spruce » Wed Dec 20, 2017 9:23 pm

Ooh, yeah, unfortunately, you can't just lower a strike plate, the whole house will need to be separated from the foundation and raised 3/16" or else everything will get thrown out of whack and that door will cease to function . . . :? :| :mrgreen: :mrgreen:


Totally teasing! 8-)

Moving the latch plate is not a big deal. Yes, fill the existing screw holes with wooden toothpicks dipped in wood glue or even simple white glue to hold them in place. I find it easiest to simply break the toothpicks in half, since you only need about 3/4" of length to fill the hole completely. Fill the hole until you have to lightly tap the last toothpick or two into place. Once the hole is completely filled, cut them off flush with a razor knife. You don't have to wait for the glue to dry to drill the new hole locations, though it can be helpful. It should be dry enough within an hour or two to continue, or you can wait until the next day if that does not create problems. Another method is to drill the hole out to 1/4" and fill it with a dowel.

Definitely predrill the new hole, this will keep the screw from splitting the jamb or wandering from the center of where you want it. You will need to carve out the jamb a little to recess the plate in the new location, simply run your screws snug to hold it in place, then run your razor knife around the edge that needs recessing, remove the plate, score your line to the necessary depth, then flat cut the debris out of the way. If you have a good quality wood chisel, that will help with debris removal.

Don't worry about filling in the void where the door latch sits, unless you have to move the latch plate so much that the screws fall into this void. From your pics, this is not the case, so don't worry about it.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

garyb
Posts: 79
Joined: Fri Mar 24, 2017 12:42 pm

Re: Moving a door's strike plate right next to its old screw hole

Post by garyb » Wed Dec 20, 2017 9:37 pm

Hahah, thanks! :) Yeah not the most involved home repair, that's for sure. But it would be nice to be able to close and lock our bedroom door, lol.

How do they get that nice factory rounded corner edge by the way? Is that done with a router?? I tried *chiseling* that rounded corner under the strike plate before but it looks pretty horrible, haha.

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A. Spruce
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Re: Moving a door's strike plate right next to its old screw hole

Post by A. Spruce » Wed Dec 20, 2017 10:03 pm

garyb wrote:
Wed Dec 20, 2017 9:37 pm
Hahah, thanks! :) Yeah not the most involved home repair, that's for sure. But it would be nice to be able to close and lock our bedroom door, lol.
Tis the season to be silly! ;) :mrgreen:

Yeah, having doors that stay closed is always a good thing.
garyb wrote:
Wed Dec 20, 2017 9:37 pm
How do they get that nice factory rounded corner edge by the way? Is that done with a router?? I tried *chiseling* that rounded corner under the strike plate before but it looks pretty horrible, haha.
Yes, a router is used in the factory to mill the hinge and strike locations. If you follow the directions I gave about screwing the strike into place and tracing its outline with a razor knife, that will get you the same exact result if you're careful. Do not try to cut the depth in one pass, make multiple light pressure strokes until you get to the depth you need, then simply peel away the chaff with either the knife or a good and sharp chisel. I say "good" and "sharp" because both are important, and all chisels are NOT made alike. If you don't have a chisel, the knife will suffice.

Don't worry about perfection, strive for it, but don't sweat it. The top of the strike area will need to be filled with sandable wood putty or spackle, you can do the same to the area you cut out if it's too rough for your liking. You can fill the voids in two ways, either leave the strike installed and fill around it or fill the areas needed without the strike in place. The former tends to chip out when you remove the strike for sanding of the patch and painting, so the latter is the better way to go. Spackle and sandable wood putty are both fairly soft compounds, so reestablishing the mortise once they've dried will be easier than the original cutting of the wood. My favor is the latter, recut the mortise, remove the strike plate, fill the top edge from the new screw hole to the top of the mortise, fill the bottom of the mortise just enough to cover any knife slips. Sand everything smooth once it dries, set the strike plate in place, outline with the knife and carefully carve away what needs to go. Once you've got everything the way you like, maybe touch up the sanding a bit, then repaint the strike portion of the jamb from top of the door to the bottom. The reason for this is that if your paint color is off just a bit, it won't show if you paint only the portion of the jamb where the door lives. When the paint is dry, install the strike, phone Santa what a good boy you've been, and await the landslide of presents come Christmas morning! :mrgreen:
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

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