Joint Compound on Wood trim edges

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TheTimDolan
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Joint Compound on Wood trim edges

Post by TheTimDolan » Sun Jan 06, 2019 10:03 am

Hi guys - newbie to the forum here. I did look around several pages but could not find anything that might meet my strange desire.

I am working on a older home, although not a professional painter - I will not rent out or live in something that would BUG me. The place has a lot of wood trim that has been gouged and nicked over the years then painted. I would like to skim coat everything with some type of mud(regular, light or setting) I have done this in the past but only on flat wall wood trimwork. No issues that I have seen so far.

Pretty much all the outside edges of the trimwork are molded and ugly - I am planning on putting on some bead strips(metal or vinyl) to make a sharp 90 degree edge filling in the molded edge. I prefer vinyl, I might use a stapler or 1.25 to affix. Then mud the heck out of it. Under the legs of the beading would be a gap over the molded design. I would rather do this than to remove/replace it all or gawd forbid wood putty the gouges and sand.

Finally my question, do you think the mud filled 90 degree edges will hold up to normal wear and tear?

Just to avoid sanding discussion - the place has been professionally inspected and all Lead Paint hazards have been removed or mitigated.

Thanks in advance, t Big fan of Shannon's YouTube.


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A. Spruce
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Re: Joint Compound on Wood trim edges

Post by A. Spruce » Sun Jan 06, 2019 11:13 am

No, I don't think drywall compound is going to work as wood filler or bondo. It's too soft and not meant for that purpose. I would go with something more along the lines of Dap wood dough, it is easy to work with and sands well.

In all honesty, if the baseboards are as torn up and ugly as you say they are, it would be far faster, easier, and cheaper to just replace them. Jerry-rigging some sort of something over them with some sort of putty is simply a recipe for disaster, not only for you to install, but for the next guy that has to deal with the mess you've created.
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Shannon
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Re: Joint Compound on Wood trim edges

Post by Shannon » Sun Jan 06, 2019 12:41 pm

Ya that mud will not really hold up IMO either. Do you have a couple pictures of the trouble areas you could post?
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TheTimDolan
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Re: Joint Compound on Wood trim edges

Post by TheTimDolan » Sun Jan 06, 2019 9:12 pm

Thanks for acks. I will do some photos tomorrow. it is mainly the door trim work. in the past i have done mud on wainscotting that had ugly vertical gouges. other times i have laid a 1/4 sheet on top of the wainscotting. These are my hold properties - so i can only blame myself. (but i ain't going to be holding them forever) This particular property had been rented to same family for close to 20 years. So i did not get in to "improve" anything along the way.

On old window sills that had a lot of cracks/aligator-ing , i would make up a wet solution of the power wood filler. Pour it, let it find it level.

Thanks again, i will get some photos later. tim,.,

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Shannon
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Re: Joint Compound on Wood trim edges

Post by Shannon » Mon Jan 07, 2019 8:42 am

These methods will work on gouges and dings in surfaces but on edges and corners they will likely knock off when bumped again
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TheTimDolan
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Re: Joint Compound on Wood trim edges

Post by TheTimDolan » Tue Jan 08, 2019 8:39 am

thanks for ideas. I hope the photos will show my issue. photo 131 shows some gouges. photo 132 shows (to me) the PITA of wood filler while maintaining the molded edge. photo 130 shows my plan, just above the floor shows what I already done, above that area is what I plan on doing with plastic or metal corner beading.

While a picky SOB, I am pragmatic and frugal - I don't want to re-trim everything or pay or spend the time to filling in the gouges while maintaining the molded trim. The house is old and hasn't been a Class A property for awhile. (for older properties - I shoot for C+ or B- quality) Looking at the layers of paint on top of varnished stain. I think I count 13 or 14 layers. :lol: :lol:

If I go this route, would it make sense to use 45 minute compound on the bead to get a good quick bond, then a few coats of green mud, then 45 minute compound on the outside edge to give it strength? Another bastard idea had was to score the trimwork with a knife to give the compound some grip.

Go ahead an laugh at my idea and mudding skill level. While you guys could mud in 3 coats - I get the J O B done but it only takes me 7 or 8 coats and having to clean the shop-vac filter twice.

Thanks again - your channel is terrific, Tim Dolan Nashua, NH US of A.

PS, before I rip out the Kitchen counter top and base cabinets. I will take some photos of the custom onsite Just-in-time assembly. The counter top is about 40-41 inches above the floor, the place was done by a Yankee. There are many, many different types of wood scraps used. For example in a basement storage closet - I have counted well over 20 different pieces of wood - some of them only one short piece. e.g. soap boxes, pallets, advertising wood signs.
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Shannon
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Re: Joint Compound on Wood trim edges

Post by Shannon » Tue Jan 08, 2019 7:44 pm

Drywall mud will work ok on flat surfaces but not on corners as mentioned before so wood filler may be best in the top couple pictures.
The plastic corners added to the other corners may work, but it’s not convensionaI so I can’t say for sure .
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A. Spruce
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Re: Joint Compound on Wood trim edges

Post by A. Spruce » Tue Jan 08, 2019 8:03 pm

The plastic corner will work, so long as it is never touched or banged. Odds are, it's going to get a beating being part of the door like that, so it is not a "fix" that I would use.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

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