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Load bearing wall?

Posted: Tue Jan 08, 2019 8:26 pm
by Jeremyq
Hey there...attached are drawings of a duplex I own. I am curious if on the 3rd floorplan to the right if the wall that goes down the middle of the house but not the front or back room is load bearing? Any thoughts? Thanks

Re: Load bearing wall?

Posted: Tue Jan 08, 2019 11:29 pm
by A. Spruce
There appears to be support posts and beams in the basement that are carried via partition wall (running parallel to stairs) through the first and second floors. My suspicion is that this is more to take flex out of the floor than acting as a structural support component. At only 16' wide, the roof trusses do not need any internal support, this is why I think it has more to do with stopping flex/noise in the floors than anything else.

If you're working with an architect, he can verify this for you. If the plans are sourced from online, try contacting the source for clarification.

Re: Load bearing wall?

Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 7:51 am
by Shannon
Yes I would agree that wall on the top floor is really not likely structural. The roof structure is spanning full width in the front and back and I would suspect that wall is really only there to partition off the rooms designed in the space.There looks to be some Hvac to deal with but nothing serious. Your architect can verify all of this easily.

Side note: A small balcony off the second floor would be nice in the jog area of the house?

Re: Load bearing wall?

Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 11:30 am
by Jeremyq
Awesome thanks guys. And I agree about the balcony. Unfortunately what's not shown is that there's another house directly beside it (row house) but I plan on building a balcony off the back from the kitchen...any ideas? I'd prefer free standing

Re: Load bearing wall?

Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 2:31 pm
by Shannon
Completely free standing at those heights (second floor) is not really great. Posts on both sides and attached to the house to secure the wobble would be best.

Re: Load bearing wall?

Posted: Wed Jan 09, 2019 2:34 pm
by A. Spruce
Agreed, the deck can be self supporting, but attached to the house for rigidity. If you don't, the deck will sway and bounce around on you, even if you brace the legs.

Re: Load bearing wall?

Posted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 2:32 am
by Jeremyq
Interesting..I've heard various recommendations. It's a house from the 1890s so balloon frame construction. Also the exterior is stucco which I've heard you should never penetrate as water can get in. Also would there be a ledger board between the floors if balloon frame? The balcony will be about 6 feet deep and the length of the house. I'd much rather attach to the house just not sure how

Re: Load bearing wall?

Posted: Sun Jan 13, 2019 9:29 am
by Shannon
With a deck at the height of the second storey I would build it in most cases as free standing but also anchor in 2 to 3 spots to the home at each level to control the wobble. These points in your case would be attached through the rim joist of the deck into two studs. I would use a pic product as a spacer at those points as well to separate ledger from house to maintain a good space tp prevent rot. At those places I would also use something like Big stretch caulking to seal around the block to keep moisture out of the stucco /wall cavity.
If however this was only a first storey deck attaching to the home may not be needed depending on the deck support structure and how long the support posts are.