Anything I should know before taking this on?

Ask your questions pertaining to the interior that don't fit in the above categories
Post Reply
wavewrangler
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2019 2:36 pm

Anything I should know before taking this on?

Post by wavewrangler » Tue Aug 27, 2019 3:10 pm

Hi. I was hoping I could get some input before I start remodeling my home office. This room was in this shape when I moved in and I just can't stand looking at it any longer. I work in this room for 10 hours a day so I want it to be nice. I want to put laminate floors down, 3-foot wanescotting, new drywall and paint, new trim and moulding, and maybe a new window. I'm also going to be building a new work desk with cable management out of a butcher block countertop to match the new flooring and paint but that is getting into decorating territory.

I've never done any of this before, haha. I figure I will just jump in, after watching countless videos on the internet. I'm kind of apprehensive about it all so I'm just looking for a trained eye to take a look and let me know if there's anything I should keep in mind before I go to ripping the carpeting out. I don't have any other way of learning other than doing it myself but I want to minimize beginner mistakes as much as I can.

One of my main concerns is the dry wall. Finishing looks like a complete pita. But the seam trim just looks awful and it's gotta go! Especially around the closet area. I want to get rid of all that nasty wood-colored trim that's up around the door and the ceiling. Is that something I can do successfully without having a lot of experience? Another concern is the phone jack on the floor and the coax cable coming up through the floor. Moving forward, I would like to condense those in to an outlet in the wall. I feel that would be much neater. Tips on that would be appreciated.

Anything else you guys want to suggest or point out to me, I would be very appreciative of that! Thanks!

Some info about the structure: Early 90's single wide, I believe the studs are 24-inches on center, I believe the sub-flooring is something called novadeck, some kind of wood-based product. Drywall is 3/8th. Dimensions are 13'x10'x7'
IMG_0294.JPG
IMG_0294.JPG (93.68 KiB) Viewed 487 times
IMG_0295.JPG
IMG_0295.JPG (99.03 KiB) Viewed 487 times
IMG_0296.JPG
IMG_0296.JPG (94.29 KiB) Viewed 487 times
IMG_0297.JPG
IMG_0297.JPG (137.35 KiB) Viewed 487 times
IMG_0298.JPG
IMG_0298.JPG (91.67 KiB) Viewed 487 times

User avatar
Shannon
Posts: 13423
Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 11:58 pm
Location: Canada
Contact:

Re: Anything I should know before taking this on?

Post by Shannon » Tue Aug 27, 2019 5:44 pm

Ok so here is my suggestion remove the wall paneling, strap the ceiling and drywall it and the walls. Might as well start from scratch. Pulling up the flooring should be no big deal but be sure that it gets cut at the door way so you don't end up tearing up the hallway stuff when you yank it out. there will be some tack strips around the perimeter and they can be removed as well. Re route the data and phone to a wall and use a combo jack to keep them nice and neat. You may want to consider having plugs added as well for better power supply management where you need it.
If you've found our videos or website information helpful, please considering making a donation using PayPal or pledging us on Patreon

wavewrangler
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2019 2:36 pm

Re: Anything I should know before taking this on?

Post by wavewrangler » Tue Aug 27, 2019 8:56 pm

Thanks for the reply, Shannon. I was watching some of your videos earlier, they're great. I don't know if I want to mess with the ceiling. I'm trying to stay under budget, which I've already adjusted a few times. Could I get away with replacing the decorative screws with regular dry wall screws and using a little compound to cover them, and doing something with the trim? Also, do you know any tricks I can use to make the space look taller? I am planning on putting up 3ft. wanescotting but I'm unsure if that will have the desired effect or the opposite of it. Thanks for reminding me of the data cables. Probably will throw some speaker wire in there while I'm at it.

Thanks again

User avatar
Shannon
Posts: 13423
Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 11:58 pm
Location: Canada
Contact:

Re: Anything I should know before taking this on?

Post by Shannon » Wed Aug 28, 2019 7:31 am

The reason they used those decorative screw washers is to help make the screw head larger and prevent it from pulling through the paneling. if you remove them and just use screws that is what may happen. You could remove them and add an extra screw between each existing one as well then cover with a strip of wood like the seems. If the wood strips are painted white they will not stand out as bad.
Ideas to make the room see taller are vertical stripes or vertical wall hangings (pictures) and lower style furniture. Get rid of that blanket on the window and add a blind that is horizontal and opens from the top down and bottom up. You can then have the privacy you may want below but allow some light to flood in over the top.
If you've found our videos or website information helpful, please considering making a donation using PayPal or pledging us on Patreon

User avatar
A. Spruce
Posts: 6406
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2016 5:23 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Anything I should know before taking this on?

Post by A. Spruce » Wed Aug 28, 2019 11:33 am

Trailers are finished out in that manner for two reasons, to save weight for transport and to be as cheap as possible to build.


For a budget build, I have pulled the trim strips off the joints, then tape the joints and float the walls with good success. If you've got vinyl or wood faced paneling, then you'll want to put a coat of primer on before taping and floating, it will help the drywall compounds stick better. What is the surface of the ceiling? If compatible, the same technique could be implemented there.

If you're willing to take the time and spend a little more money, then pulling the paneling and ceiling off and replacing with drywall will be the better way to go. This will also allow you to move your phone and data cables into the wall where they belong, as well as upgrade insulation and appurtenances as necessary.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

wavewrangler
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2019 2:36 pm

Re: Anything I should know before taking this on?

Post by wavewrangler » Wed Aug 28, 2019 11:12 pm

Thanks for all of the great information from both of you guys! I do appreciate your time. So, Mr. Spruce, one thing I am doing is taking all the old wall paneling out. Not sure if you can see in the pictures, but it's in bad shape. Hundreds of holes, lots of damage around the base from previous occupants. Somebody even put one lone piece of moulding to hide some of it! I calculated it to be $130 worth of drywall, not including mud and the tools I will need. But I'll then have tools so for future projects so that's OK with me. Any budget minded suggestions here for someone that has NO dry wall tools and is just starting out?

To answer your question, the ceiling looks to be some textured drywall panels, 12 feet long. I think it will look fine if I double the screws up, and paint the trim.

Is floating difficult for a beginner? I am really nervous about that. That's the one thing on the whole project that I'm nervous about!

Here is a quick render I did with sketchup, not really complete but I've never used the program before so I'm still learning. It's a rough idea of what I am going for. I'm still working on colors and stuff. The wall is green granite by valspar. Any suggestions? I'll come back and post updates here so you can comment as I go if you like, or if I have a question, if you don't mind! :)

Thanks! :-)
render1.JPG
render1.JPG (49.49 KiB) Viewed 445 times

User avatar
A. Spruce
Posts: 6406
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2016 5:23 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Anything I should know before taking this on?

Post by A. Spruce » Thu Aug 29, 2019 12:09 am

wavewrangler wrote:
Wed Aug 28, 2019 11:12 pm
Thanks for all of the great information from both of you guys! I do appreciate your time. So, Mr. Spruce, one thing I am doing is taking all the old wall paneling out. Not sure if you can see in the pictures, but it's in bad shape. Hundreds of holes, lots of damage around the base from previous occupants. Somebody even put one lone piece of moulding to hide some of it! I calculated it to be $130 worth of drywall, not including mud and the tools I will need. But I'll then have tools so for future projects so that's OK with me. Any budget minded suggestions here for someone that has NO dry wall tools and is just starting out?
With the paneling in that bad of shape, it's definitely better to pull it and install drywall. You'll probably be into materials for around $200, not a bad price to completely transform a room. Good quality tools will set you back about another $150 by the time you buy a 14" stainless steel pan, 3", 6", and 12" knives, maybe a corner knife too. Stick to professional grade tools (Goldblatt is a good one), they will perform much better than anything out of the budget bin which will make you look and feel like a pro, enjoy the work more, and have something for future use.

Another tip, take care of your tools, clean and dry them during and after use, they will last longer and perform better. If you're going to texture the walls, then you'll also need a texture gun and compressor. I think TGs are running around $80 to $100. I would recommend holding out for an oiled air compressor pump over a dry pump, they're quieter and last longer. Also, a piston pump over a pancake compressor (diaphragm style) is much quieter and has a faster recovery.

The one thing that will be an absolute must with this set up is a ball valve to put between the air line and the TG. The way a TG works is that it passes a constant stream of air through its nozzle, the trigger releases the texture into the air stream, so, basically, you'd be cutting the end off the hose and expecting your compressor to keep up, resulting in a ridiculous CFM requirement. By installing the ball valve you can not only turn the air flow on/off to allow a small portable compressor to recover, you can also modulate the amount of air flow, which affects the size and disbursement of the texture globules. I've been using the same 1.5 gallon portable compressor since 1992, shot I don't know how many thousands of square feet of texture, and it's still running as strong today as the day I bought it. Point being, small portable compressor is more than capable of blowing texture IF you have a ball valve.
wavewrangler wrote:
Wed Aug 28, 2019 11:12 pm
To answer your question, the ceiling looks to be some textured drywall panels, 12 feet long. I think it will look fine if I double the screws up, and paint the trim.
If you're going to double up screws, you're going to have to fill them, which means scraping off the texture if possible, fill the screws, and if you're going to this much trouble, you might as well tape the seams too. Again, I personally feel that it's well worth the effort.
wavewrangler wrote:
Wed Aug 28, 2019 11:12 pm
Is floating difficult for a beginner? I am really nervous about that. That's the one thing on the whole project that I'm nervous about!
Doing drywall is not difficult, however, it is a learned ability, so it will take some time to learn how to use the tools properly and get the finish you're looking for. I highly recommend watching some videos on the subject, I believe Shannon has several of them, if not, go find vids from pros doing it that make it look effortless and study their techniques. The key is to not over-apply the mud and not over-work it. Hold in your mind that you want a baby's butt smooth surface when you're done, with little to no sanding required to get it that way, then make sure that every stroke of the knife is towards that end.

Again, doing drywall is a learned ability, so while you might have perfection in your mind, you're not going to get there with your first pan of mud. You didn't learn to ride a bike in 60 seconds, it took time and practice, it's the same thing with drywall, it will take time and practice to hone your skills.
wavewrangler wrote:
Wed Aug 28, 2019 11:12 pm
Here is a quick render I did with sketchup, not really complete but I've never used the program before so I'm still learning. It's a rough idea of what I am going for. I'm still working on colors and stuff. The wall is green granite by valspar. Any suggestions? I'll come back and post updates here so you can comment as I go if you like, or if I have a question, if you don't mind! :)
If you can turn that sow's ear of a room to anything even slightly near your rendering, you will have been successful! I've used thousands of gallons of Valspar paint over the years, it's a nice quality, user friendly, yet inexpensive paint. I also recommend Zinsser Bull's Eye 123 primer (blue label), again, good quality, reasonably priced.

If wainscot is on your agenda, I recommend using plywood over MDF, simply because it will lay flatter, especially at the seams. MDF has a tendency to undulate, warp, and otherwise not be a flat surface, it also "puckers" around the fasteners. Plywood doesn't do that.

We look forward to updates as you progress with this project. If you have any more questions, feel free to post them, we're more than glad to help. 8-)
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

User avatar
Shannon
Posts: 13423
Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 11:58 pm
Location: Canada
Contact:

Re: Anything I should know before taking this on?

Post by Shannon » Thu Aug 29, 2019 7:34 am

I will add here that I would not bother with the inside drywall trowel. I have a video showing using one but they really are a pain. I have another video showing how to do the inside corners with a 6" ,it is not simple either but better results.
You will also want a drywall whip and 1/2" drill, purchase a 5gal. pail of all-purpose drywall mud and it will do this entire project.We don't texture walls here at all but if you do you will likely need more mud.
I have not worked in mobile homes a lot but it would not surprise me if that ceiling was textured paneling and not drywall?
Good luck, the sketch you have looks great BTW.
If you've found our videos or website information helpful, please considering making a donation using PayPal or pledging us on Patreon

User avatar
A. Spruce
Posts: 6406
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2016 5:23 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Anything I should know before taking this on?

Post by A. Spruce » Thu Aug 29, 2019 9:06 am

Shannon wrote:
Thu Aug 29, 2019 7:34 am
I will add here that I would not bother with the inside drywall trowel. I have a video showing using one but they really are a pain. I have another video showing how to do the inside corners with a 6" ,it is not simple either but better results.
Normally, I would 100% agree, however, my partner had an inside corner trowel on the bathroom we just finished up, it worked amazingly well. I was reticent to try it because my experience told me it was junk, but this one worked and worked pretty darned well. It was a Goldblatt and had probably 5" wings, and was nice and flexy like a flat knife is. The one I had 25 years ago was much smaller and stiffer and didn't work at all.

Mud the corner and knock it down with a flat knife to even out and remove the excess mud, zip the corner knife through until you're happy with the results, then follow up with the flat knife to remove the beads along the edges. SSOOOO much faster than using a flat knife for the whole thing.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

wavewrangler
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2019 2:36 pm

Re: Anything I should know before taking this on?

Post by wavewrangler » Thu Aug 29, 2019 4:22 pm

Wow, I don't know where to start, so much great information. First and foremost, Shannon's videos are what brought me here...they're just really well done and informative. Clear, concise. Can't say enough good about them. I guess at this point, I'm not going to write out a long reply, I don't have much to add yet until I start the project. I just wanted to thank you guys for taking so much time to help me, especially you A. Spruce, that one reply looked like it took a while to compile. I will follow all of the advice given. I'll get quality, I'll get one of those valve's thinga-ma-jiggers (LOL) I was worried about the compressor bit, and you touched on that too. Now I'm not so much. I'll get quality only and I'll consider the ceiling. I am going to buy the sheetrock on Monday or Tuesday and start taking out old drywall then as well.

So I'm doing the floor, the sheetrock (walls as of now) - from what I have learned, I am leaning toward doing the walls first, minus the paint. Is this the right order? Or should I do the flooring first?

User avatar
A. Spruce
Posts: 6406
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2016 5:23 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Anything I should know before taking this on?

Post by A. Spruce » Thu Aug 29, 2019 8:51 pm

Flooring should be the last thing done. Get the drywall finished and painted, ceiling too, then worry about floor, otherwise you're having to protect your floors from paint and drywall spatter, and there's just no need to do that.

As always, if you need any help or suggestions in choosing tools and equipment, we're here to help. Need any more details on the finer points of drywall finishing or painting, yup, we're here for that too! 8-)
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

User avatar
Shannon
Posts: 13423
Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 11:58 pm
Location: Canada
Contact:

Re: Anything I should know before taking this on?

Post by Shannon » Thu Aug 29, 2019 10:55 pm

Good luck, we are always here when you need us.
If you've found our videos or website information helpful, please considering making a donation using PayPal or pledging us on Patreon

wavewrangler
Posts: 5
Joined: Tue Aug 27, 2019 2:36 pm

Re: Anything I should know before taking this on?

Post by wavewrangler » Fri Sep 06, 2019 3:49 pm

Hey guys just want to let you know where I'm at.
I purchased all the drywall tools I think I will need. I went with Level 5 mostly, they seemed to offer the best quality for the best price. I went with carbon steel instead of stainless, because I read that stainless is much stiffer. I understand I will likely deal with rust and that's okay.

List of tools purchased for this project so far: 3-inch drywall knife, 6-inch drywall knife, 12-inch drywall knife, mixer attachment, 14-inch stainless mud tray, inside corner tool, drywall hand saw, new portable drill (had Ni-Ca before, went with Li-Ion), 3-gallon pancake compressor, air-powered 18-guage nail gun. I will be adding a miter saw so for the trim and moulding. I had to wait for this hurricane to pass before I thought about purchasing dry wall. I will be doing that soon. Is there anything that I'm missing?

This has quickly ballooned in cost. What was once going to be a simple office renovation has now turned in to a complicated man-cave project of sorts. Of course, I had to have the TV. And if I'm adding the TV, I might as well have surround sound, right? Since I'm adding that, and I'll have the walls open, might as well put speaker cable in the walls. Of course. Might as well add optical TOSLINK. Why stop there when I can also add digital coax and HDMI? Let's not forget the Cat6 and regular coax...and discovering keystone connectors didn't make matters any better. I have spent more on cabling and connectors than I will spend on the drywall and flooring combined. I'm not the only one that does this, am I? This is ridiculous! It is going to be pretty neat, though!

Last night, my wife and I hunkered down for Hurricane Dorian. We live on the coast of North Carolina and I must say it was pretty scary at times, but we're okay. No damage to the property. One thing I am concerned about is I could hear the drywall in the living room flexing at times during peak gusts. Is that going to be a problem going seamless? Is all it going to take is a hurricane and the joint compound will start to crack?

Also, with all of the media and data connectors I am wanting to install, I am wondering if you guys know of a more efficient solution than in-wall boxes and face plates. Almost seems like some sort of accessible built-in wall strip conduit type solution would be best. Something that blends in well. Does anything like this exist on the market? I know it wouldn't look -as nice- as face plates, but that's okay. To be honest, as many as I am thinking I'll need, I don't know how good that will look anyway.

I think that's all for now. Sorry for all the extra info here, I felt like sharing with you guys! Thanks.

User avatar
A. Spruce
Posts: 6406
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2016 5:23 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Anything I should know before taking this on?

Post by A. Spruce » Fri Sep 06, 2019 6:05 pm

Glad to hear you weathered Dorian unscathed. I've got a close friend down in Wilmington/Cape Fear area that I was worried about, he said they got nothing. At any rate, glad to hear you made it without a scratch.

Funny how projects tend to balloon. I'm just finishing a bathroom project that started out as about a $13K project and that quickly escalated into somewhere around $21K. I'm not the primary on the project, so I'm not privy to exact numbers, but I do know we broke the 20K mark. Quite a bit was added as we went along, from remodeling the closet to having to install a large recessed header.

With you having to buy all your tools to do this project, that easily adds a significant amount to the total, the rainbow is that you now have those tools for other projects as the come up, so much less expense into the future.

Steel drywall tools are fine, however you MUST care for them or they'll rust up beyond use. Keep them clean during use and absolutely clean them well at the end of each day and dry them. If you don't dry them they'll rust.

If you're leaving the existing drywall/wall covering in place, I'd screw it off as if it were a new install, this will stabilize it and keep it from having problems in the future. It sounds to me like you've got enough electrical and data lines to run that stripping the walls and replacing with fresh drywall is the way to go. With a fresh install, I don't think you'll have any problems in the future with storm movement, unless it's excessive, then you might have a corner bubble or tear, but "field" of the wall should be fine.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

Post Reply