Lowering ceiling by 1.5"

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csankar69
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Lowering ceiling by 1.5"

Post by csankar69 » Fri Nov 22, 2019 3:12 pm

I have to lower by basement ceiling by 1.5" to clear duct work and be able to attach dry wall to it. I am thinking of attaching 2x2 or 2x3 wood studs perpendicular to the ceiling joists every 16" (using 3" construction screws). Are there any advantages or disadvantages of going with the 2x3s instead of the 2x2s? I have read that its easier to find straight 2x3s compared to 2x2s, and that the 2x3 also provides a wider space for screwing when drywalls butt against each other. On the other hand given the heavier weight of the 2x3 (compared to 2x2) is it better to just go with the 2x2s to avoid any sagging or stability issues later on (i.e., not falling off the ceiling!)?

On a related note is there a way to bring the ceiling down by 3.5" (at another location) without building a soffit?

Clarence
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Re: Lowering ceiling by 1.5"

Post by Clarence » Fri Nov 22, 2019 5:03 pm

USG recommendation The Gypsum Construction Handbook page # 3 PARA: 4 " Application wood furring applied across framing. Furring should be nom. 2" X 2" minimum ( may be nom. 1" X 3" if panels are screw attached ). It also states 3/4" furring is not recommended.
To drop ceiling with out a soffit look at the Metal Grid cross members for Drywall panels & use metal strap to hang it from the joist screw attached to both.

csankar69
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Re: Lowering ceiling by 1.5"

Post by csankar69 » Fri Nov 22, 2019 5:36 pm

I'm trying to decide if a 2x3 is better than a 2x2 to screw to the ceiling joists for attaching drywall to.

Any video link for the metal grid cross members?

Clarence
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Re: Lowering ceiling by 1.5"

Post by Clarence » Fri Nov 22, 2019 9:56 pm

For using 2" X 3" instead of 2" X 2' is fine you just can't go smaller than the 2' X 2".
To find the metal grid research metal Grid for drywall panels they are manufactured by USG & Armstrong.

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Aaron
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Re: Lowering ceiling by 1.5"

Post by Aaron » Sat Nov 23, 2019 2:27 pm

That sounds like the strapping that is run perpendicular to joists that is common practice in the New England states. Word is they do it for the blue board that they skim with mud.

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Shannon
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Re: Lowering ceiling by 1.5"

Post by Shannon » Sun Nov 24, 2019 9:01 am

2x3 will give you a little wider surface to attach the drywall too . If you have a decent table saw and ripping blade you could make your own by cutting 2x6s in half. Also if you are using ceiling drywall you could space them 24" o.c. Chances are your joists are not all perfectly aligned to each other and you may have to shim the strapping to create a flatter plane.
To drop the area 3-1/2" I would consider using steel studs on edge if the area is not huge? Not sure exactly what you are doing? Dropping an entire room 3-1/2" is not recommended if your ceiling height will be real low? Your better to just drop the area under the ducts IMO.
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csankar69
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Re: Lowering ceiling by 1.5"

Post by csankar69 » Sun Nov 24, 2019 11:47 pm

Thanks all. Shannon, I'm just dropping a small portion by 3.5". By 'steel studs on edge' do you mean use the 3 5/8" side of the stud to get the 3.5" clearance? If yes, how would I attach the top flange of the stud to the joist (it's hard for the drill driver to get into the top flange so as to be able to screw in)?

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Shannon
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Re: Lowering ceiling by 1.5"

Post by Shannon » Mon Nov 25, 2019 8:27 am

Generally you can flex the stud enough to get in and insert a screw. Just don't bend the stud if you can help it. Alternatively you could use wood 2x4s to do the same thing and use adhesive and toe screw it to the joists.
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