Lean-to shed

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tmccar
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Re: Lean-to shed

Post by tmccar » Mon Sep 16, 2019 12:04 pm

Yes that would be more manageable-I might do it like that.
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tmccar
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Re: Lean-to shed

Post by tmccar » Wed Oct 02, 2019 6:22 am

I finally got started on the concrete slab, after buying a mixer. 50% of it was enough for me for one day! I'm a bit disappointed with the rough surface finish, but my tools were fairly basic.
Also, the gravel we bought has a high proportion of small stones, which can be an issue when trying to "float" .
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Shannon
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Re: Lean-to shed

Post by Shannon » Wed Oct 02, 2019 8:04 am

Concrete is a tricky beast and takes a lot of practice.This is why I suggested smaller portions that armoire manageable . What you did looks ok especially for a first timer. You have no doubt learned a few things that you can implement on your next section. Good luck and thanks for the update.
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A. Spruce
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Re: Lean-to shed

Post by A. Spruce » Wed Oct 02, 2019 9:54 am

Part of the purpose of the troweling process is to push those rocks down into the mud and create a layer of "cream" over the top. It is this cream layer that allows for a fine finish.

Part of the problem working with a mixer is getting enough concrete on the ground to be finished before it starts to set because once it starts setting, you're not going to be able to push rocks down into the mud, resulting in less cream on top to be able to get a good finish.

For future reference, you did not need the form boards against the walls, only one at the open back and the front where you ended the slab. These two edge boards alone would have sufficed for your screed surface and you would have had nice tight joints along the walls. Another option would have been to use felt expansion joint material, still unnecessary, but not out of place either.

What you CAN do is for your next section, remove the center form board and pour your new concrete right up against the previous pour, using the previous pour as your screed point. You will still have what's called a cold joint for the concrete to flex/move, you don't need anything in the joint.

The only other minor thing would have been to use an edge tool to round the top corner of the slab, which looks a little nicer and helps to prevent chipping of the edge in use. It would also make the center seam look nicer.
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Shannon
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Re: Lean-to shed

Post by Shannon » Wed Oct 02, 2019 2:10 pm

Ya good point Spruce I never noticed the edge forms, not needed at all in this case.
Just one more thing I would add ,if you think the next pour is going to be to much to deal with again just split what you have left in half again. You could even do it the other direction if that makes things any easier? You can get around from side to side without walking around building.
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A. Spruce
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Re: Lean-to shed

Post by A. Spruce » Wed Oct 02, 2019 4:14 pm

Shannon wrote:
Wed Oct 02, 2019 2:10 pm
Just one more thing I would add ,if you think the next pour is going to be to much to deal with again just split what you have left in half again. You could even do it the other direction if that makes things any easier? You can get around from side to side without walking around building.
I would have split this into 4 equal squares and poured the opposite corners first, pulled the center forms and pour the other opposing corners. Or, to make less work, one corner at a time. Either way, plenty of work space, definitive edges to easily work, and easy to stop/start as the need/mood sees fit. 8-)

FWIW, this is how I poured my patio, which was five sections that were 8'x10'. Everything was formed and I poured every other section. A week later, I pulled the divider forms and poured the remaining sections against the new pads, no expansion joint materials were used against the building or between the slabs.
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Shannon
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Re: Lean-to shed

Post by Shannon » Wed Oct 02, 2019 5:00 pm

A. Spruce wrote:
Wed Oct 02, 2019 4:14 pm
Shannon wrote:
Wed Oct 02, 2019 2:10 pm
Just one more thing I would add ,if you think the next pour is going to be to much to deal with again just split what you have left in half again. You could even do it the other direction if that makes things any easier? You can get around from side to side without walking around building.
I would have split this into 4 equal squares and poured the opposite corners first, pulled the center forms and pour the other opposing corners. Or, to make less work, one corner at a time. Either way, plenty of work space, definitive edges to easily work, and easy to stop/start as the need/mood sees fit. 8-)

FWIW, this is how I poured my patio, which was five sections that were 8'x10'. Everything was formed and I poured every other section. A week later, I pulled the divider forms and poured the remaining sections against the new pads, no expansion joint materials were used against the building or between the slabs.
Yes that is a great way to go for sure.
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tmccar
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Re: Lean-to shed

Post by tmccar » Thu Oct 03, 2019 4:06 am

Yes, I have actually done a second pour that is half the remainder - much easier to deal with! And of course I can see now that I didn't need the side forms - I will probably take them out and fill in the gaps. Also good to know that the "cold joint will work.

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melvingoodman
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Re: Lean-to shed

Post by melvingoodman » Mon Oct 07, 2019 7:56 am

You can hire, some contractor to manage your concrete slab

tmccar
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Re: Lean-to shed

Post by tmccar » Tue Oct 08, 2019 12:34 pm

melvingoodman wrote:
Mon Oct 07, 2019 7:56 am
You can hire, some contractor to manage your concrete slab
I suppose I could, but that sounds rather expensive!

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A. Spruce
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Re: Lean-to shed

Post by A. Spruce » Tue Oct 08, 2019 7:23 pm

I'd guess around $800 to hire a pro PLUS the cost of concrete. Not terrible, but if you're handy and on a budget, this is something that is easily done yourself, as evidenced by you doing it yourself. :mrgreen:
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tmccar
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Re: Lean-to shed

Post by tmccar » Fri Oct 11, 2019 9:15 am

Well I got it finished in 3 sections.
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Next I plan to bolt 6x2's to the slab in a rectangle, and do a framed wall on the right-hand side (with joists at 18" centres)
Then I plan to attach the saddle to the left-hand wall, and run ceiling joists on the same centres as the wall joists.
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A. Spruce
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Re: Lean-to shed

Post by A. Spruce » Fri Oct 11, 2019 9:45 am

16" and 24" are the typical wall stud and roof rafter spacing. Unless you're expecting snow loads, I think 24" centers would suffice. Aligning your rafters over your wall studs is an excellent idea.

Curious why you've chosen to slope the roof forward to the "entrance" side of things instead of out the back where it doesn't matter OR off to the lower right side? Two things with this, first, sealing the roof against the wall will be a chore and likely a constant headache/leak. Second, the runoff is in the entrance/driveway where you're always going to be. If you run it off the back or right side, nothing to worry about.

If you slope from the high wall to the low wall (existing cinder block walls), it will be far easier to tie the roofs together in a watertight fashion.
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tmccar
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Re: Lean-to shed

Post by tmccar » Sat Oct 12, 2019 3:40 am

I think you may be misinterpreting my drawing. I am sloping it towards the right (the old sloping wall).
The "entrance" is open as yet, but I will be putting a framed wall with a door here.
I intend to have a framed wall at the back also.
Yes I think I'll go for 24" centres.

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A. Spruce
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Re: Lean-to shed

Post by A. Spruce » Sat Oct 12, 2019 5:13 am

tmccar wrote:
Sat Oct 12, 2019 3:40 am
I think you may be misinterpreting my drawing. I am sloping it towards the right (the old sloping wall).
Maybe, it just looks like you've got a forward rake on the roof, not a slope down to the right.
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tmccar
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Re: Lean-to shed

Post by tmccar » Sat Oct 12, 2019 9:11 am

Yes, I think it's an optical illusion. (Perhaps because the left-hand block wall if falling away from front to back. But the front view ("C3" shows the angle that all the rafters are lying at.)

I haven't given up on the idea of extending the left iron roof - if i go with that, I would be following the slope on the existing shed from front to back

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