Cargo Trailer

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A. Spruce
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Cargo Trailer

Post by A. Spruce » Sat Sep 14, 2019 11:36 am

Hey guys,

I'm in the market for an enclosed work trailer, 6x12 with at least 6' interior height. Budget dictates buying a used trailer.

1 - What are good brands/manufacturers to look for, and why?

2 - What are the ones to stay away from, and why?

3 - Torsion axle or leaf spring? My opinion is spring over torsion for durability/longevity

4 - Tire age - How old is too old, even if the tires look to be in good shape? My opinion is 5 to 8 years

As always, thanks for your thoughts. 8-)
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Clarence
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Re: Cargo Trailer

Post by Clarence » Sat Sep 14, 2019 1:27 pm

Years ago I purchased an used U-Haul trailer it was very well constructed I used as a construction trailer never had a problem with it.

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Aaron
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Re: Cargo Trailer

Post by Aaron » Sat Sep 14, 2019 3:34 pm

That's a good idea. You got to think a rental/moving company would have good quality used trailers.

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Shannon
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Re: Cargo Trailer

Post by Shannon » Sat Sep 14, 2019 10:07 pm

Ah I got ya convinced! LOL

My first enclosed was a used "Royal" trailer . It was a 7x14 flat nose with leaf springs, dual axles, ramp rear door and single side door. The interior was 1/2" plywood and I added cabinets and anchor points to the walls and floor. It honestly was a good trailer and I think it was 8 yrs old by the time I sold it. When I had it there was a bad hail storm and it was actually written off by insurance and I bought it back because it was just cosmetic damage, used it for another year ,sold it and then purchased a new trailer.

The trailer I have now is an" Agassiz" trailer with the triple wedge nose. (top is sloped as well as the sides for better pulling) two torflex axles, and same doors as my old one.It i listed as a 7'x14' but with the V nose I can put two rows of 16' 2x6s on the floor in the centre because of the extra length with the nose and it is only 6" in actual outside length (bumper to ball) then my old flat nose trailer . Inside the interior was finished with 1/2" plywood as well as double rows of E- track load attachment rails welded right to the steal tube wall structure. These are very nice and allows easy anchoring an almost endless combinations with many different attachments that can be bought to customize the usage of these tracks. I love that option and would not go without it again.The other frill I have on this trailer is the power hitch jack. I sounds silly but there can be days I may unhook more then once a day and this is a big plus with the power jack. Would not be without that feature again.It has been a very robust trailer for me and I have had it since 2013 . It is a little heavier then the old trailer but is built with a little more steel. I do find that with just my standard tools in it (no lumber) it seems a little more bouncy then the spring suspension trailer I had. Lowering the tire pressure has helped with that. The only real down fall if I can find one is with the flat nose trailer I had a spare tire mounted out on the frame infant of the nose but with the V nose I would have to carry a spare inside or in the truck if I wanted to. I don't carry every day for that reason ,unless I am heading a distance out of town.As of now I have never needed it on either trailer (knock on wood).

One thing to watch for on cheaper trailers is many of them do not use anything to separate the steal framing meters from touching the aluminum finish pieces (skin) this cause a reaction because of the two metals and causes earily rot problems in the aluminum.
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A. Spruce
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Re: Cargo Trailer

Post by A. Spruce » Sun Sep 15, 2019 12:29 am

Shannon wrote:
Sat Sep 14, 2019 10:07 pm
Ah I got ya convinced! LOL
Less "convinced", more budgetary necessity. :mrgreen: A trailer is cheaper than a truck and I'm not ready to give up the Burb just yet. If I had my way, I'd be buying a utility or dump trailer, preferably a dump trailer, but I gotta have a secure and watertight way to store and haul tools and supplies.

I'm seeing a few V-nose on Craigslist. I went to a dealer a few weeks ago to see what trailers in general go for and the V-nose, or what passes for one here, added maybe a foot to the interior, didn't seem worth the money at the time. FWIW, a V-nose is an upgrade option in most trailers here.

Interesting that you say the new trailer has torsion axles, yet is bouncier than your older trailer with springs. All reports are the opposite, that torsion axles have a smoother ride. Personally, I think a spring suspension is more durable, and it's cheaper to replace springs than it is an entire torsion axle when things quit working as they should.
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Shannon
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Re: Cargo Trailer

Post by Shannon » Sun Sep 15, 2019 8:34 am

I have always like to have at least 14' inside since I can then carry lengths of interior trim .I used to have a rack on the box of my truck for years so that worked fine for long material , but I have gone away from that now. The truck I bought back in 2015 has a sliding rear window and I have found I can actually slide lengths in the window, up to the dash and they still sit on the tailgate.Not the best way but for a few pieces on occasional trip it works ok.

Yes I was surprised about the torsion axles as well but I think they are 6000lb and until they have a bit more load on them then just my tools they are a bit bouncy. The tires are rated to be aired to 50LB but unless i have a real load on or head out on the highway I keep them about 35lbs and it helps a lot.

Speaking of tires I have never had a problem with my cargo trailer tires (they would be 6 yrs old now) but my camper tires needed replacing after 5-6 yrs because the side walls cracked so bad. Sitting out side in the sun all year and being a much heavier trailer was likely the cause. Tire guy said that is really common on those types of trailers. My cargo is inside when not in use for the most part so maybe that helped it? Although my dump trailer is outside all year and its 14 yrs old(not sure if tires are original as I purchased it used about 10yrs ago.)
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Shannon
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Re: Cargo Trailer

Post by Shannon » Sun Sep 15, 2019 8:37 am

Maybe "bounce" is not the correct term for the ride of the trailer ? "Rough" maybe a better term ,I think until there is better weight on it the torsions are too stiff?
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A. Spruce
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Re: Cargo Trailer

Post by A. Spruce » Sun Sep 15, 2019 9:59 am

I'm trying to avoid going over 12' in length, just because that starts getting to be a lot of trailer to lug around and have to navigate through parking lots and tight driveways. The Burb is supposedly rated to tow 8K, but I wouldn't want to push her that hard. The trailers I've been looking at weigh in the 1200 - 1600 pound range and a 3500 GVW. That's good enough until I can get a proper work truck.

Side note: The bathroom we just remodeled, the first dump load was 2100 pounds of debris, I'd estimate the trailer at around 1000 pounds, give or take, and the Burb didn't even know it was there, other than stopping it, and even that wasn't a big deal, just noticed it took a bit more pedal effort and a little more distance than usual.

I use the same "through the window" trick in the roommates truck and now with the Burb, which can fit 8' behind the front seat and up to 16' if it comes to the dash and hangs out the back. The top rack isn't made for weight nor overly long stuff, especially if it's limp like trim tends to be.
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