Charge water lines for inspection or not?

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Flywelder
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Charge water lines for inspection or not?

Post by Flywelder » Tue Aug 13, 2019 8:59 pm

I'm plumbing an addition to my home. The only water connections will be for a clothes washer, and gas clothes dryer, and a utility tub. Do I need to actually connect the PEX water lines to my existing PEX water lines prior to my plumbing inspection? Or do I just have to have the PEX lines run where I want them?
Will the inspector want to inspect my actual / physical water connections? PS: to charge the water lines I have to go under my house, into the crawl space to do so,and it is all belly movement down there. I doubt the inspector will go down there. In the past visits, he never wants to be here very long, and he is always dressed in white, and there are no dirt marks on his clothes!
Flywelder, USA NC

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Shannon
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Re: Charge water lines for inspection or not?

Post by Shannon » Tue Aug 13, 2019 9:39 pm

You will need to connect them at some point anyways? All he needs to do is turn the valve and if water does not come out he knows they are not connected.
We don't really have plumbing inspections here so I could not say for sure what he will want to see.
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Flywelder
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Re: Charge water lines for inspection or not?

Post by Flywelder » Tue Aug 13, 2019 9:54 pm

Okay, and wow! no plumbing inspections!!! Lucky you folks! Life is better in Canada! Okay so where can I go to ask and learn exactly what the inspector here will look at? any ideas?
Yes, I thought about just connecting them also, but, I don't have heat in that space as yet, and I don't know that I will have it in place before this winter. Plus, I still have to hang the sheet rock and these water lines will be on the outside of the sheet rock, so it has to go on first, and the lines come through the sheet rock. Plus I can't close up the wall until the inspector sees what will be behind the sheet rock, so he told me.

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Shannon
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Re: Charge water lines for inspection or not?

Post by Shannon » Wed Aug 14, 2019 8:44 am

I would suspect in this case if you explain exactly what you just wrote you will be fine not hooked up. Sounds like you will have a final inspection at a later date any ways?
Many places in Canada do but here its more relaxed for renos once you are hooked to the main city lines.
You must of pulled a permit so that office is where i would ask questions.
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Flywelder
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Re: Charge water lines for inspection or not?

Post by Flywelder » Wed Aug 14, 2019 10:53 pm

Thank you, and yes I will get a final inspection later, I think that is how it works. I pulled the permits back in 2016! So recalling the details is getting cloudy. I thought I could go to the permit office also for answers. but when I did, the permit office employee told me, and I quote: " that is not why we are here, and that I should read the code, it explains everything and it is available on line, and if I don't understand it, then I should hire some one who does, to do the work for me." unquote. A good for nothing office / dept. and exists only to generate money for the county and city, I think!

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A. Spruce
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Re: Charge water lines for inspection or not?

Post by A. Spruce » Wed Aug 14, 2019 11:36 pm

Flywelder wrote:
Wed Aug 14, 2019 10:53 pm
A good for nothing office / dept. and exists only to generate money for the county and city, I think!
This has been my stance since I entered the trades over 30 years ago. Building permits are for the sole purpose of generating revenue for the municipality, they have absolutely nothing to do with building or occupant safety.

The second part of this is that not very many individuals, pros and novices alike, can actually read and understand the code book because it is not written as an informational/educational document, it is simply lawyerly technospeak. On top of this, inspectors have the authority to interpret the code, or make up stuff, as they see fit. Piss off an inspector and you will NEVER pass an inspection, no matter how close to the book your work actually is. It is a true treat when you get an inspector capable of working with you to satisfy code, and more importantly, know when certain codes apply to your specific needs and when they don't.

IMHO, the code book needs to be written in layman's terms so that the very people tasked with following it can do so without having to go to trade school for 4 years or paying off inspectors Yeah, this is a thing, my first real job in the industry was for a contractor who had several inspectors on their payroll. This was proven by the fact that all our jobs had the same 2 inspectors every time, AND, when I'd do side work exactly as I was seeing work done by this company, I'd fail inspections. :roll: Which also rolls us back to the original point, permits are for the sole purpose of revenue enhancement.
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