Moving bathroom sink plumbing to the shared or common wall

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DPFAST
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Re: Moving bathroom sink plumbing to the shared or common wall

Post by DPFAST » Fri Nov 16, 2018 4:45 pm

Aaron wrote:
Fri Nov 16, 2018 1:32 pm
Bathroom sinks in the US typically use 1 1/4" slip-joint waste assemblies (kits), and kitchen sinks use 1 1/2" slip-joint waste assemblies (kits). They look nearly identical, save for that extra 1/4 inch, so you got to make sure you're getting the right size kit depending what sink you're dealing with.

Both PVC and ABS trap adapters exist to connect to either 2" or 1 1/2" ABS or PVC pipe to accommodate connection to 1 1/2" slip-joint waste assemblies (kitchen), and both a PVC and ABS trap adapters exists to connect to 1 1/2" ABS/PVC pipe to accommodate 1 1/4" slip-joint waste assemblies. Note that sometimes these trap adapters are called "marvel connectors", for whatever reason.t
Thank you Aaron. I actually went with 1.5 plastic pipes from the wall all the way to the sink tail. Then I used 1.5 to 1.25 conversion connector with special gasket on the sink tail so now everything works ok. I think the sink even drains faster if fully filled. The wall pipe is 1.5.


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Shannon
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Re: Moving bathroom sink plumbing to the shared or common wall

Post by Shannon » Fri Nov 16, 2018 4:49 pm

#1 and#2--The wall appears bowed because of the build up of mud in the two corners. I would not worry about it , once you install the tiles and grout that gap is covered and never seen again. You can simply caulk the joint between the counter and tile /grout and that will be your seal.

#3 --- Smooth finished tiles will be easiest to clean as apposed to a rough textured finish.

#4--- Not sure the faucet height has really anything to do with tile height ,I think that is a personal preference kind of thing . Generally 4"- 6" is common.

#5---" Toe Kick", Generally that are matched to the cabinet finish or some people will run the flooring up that space as well. Most off the shelf cabinets come with the toe kick and are not sold separately but you could check with the cabinet retailer or the cabinet manufacture themselves.
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A. Spruce
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Re: Moving bathroom sink plumbing to the shared or common wall

Post by A. Spruce » Fri Nov 16, 2018 5:29 pm

1 - I agree with Shannon, it's the mudding of the walls that created the appearance of a bow.
2 - Caulk if for now will be fine, then get your backsplash done as soon as possible.
3 - Smooth tile or matching stone for the splash.
4 - Typical tile backsplash is around 3-1/2" to 6" high, depending on the materials used. Typically a bull nose edged 4" or 6" tile is glued to the wall, if this is the type of tile you are going to use, then you will also need two tiles with two edges bull nosed for the outside corners. If you are using that designer tile shown in the pic , then you're going to have to cut some pieces so that you've got a square end to finish the outside and inside corners with. Not a big deal, but this does add a level of complexity for a novice.
5 - The cabinet should have come with a toe-kick, if it didn't, check with the supplier on a replacement. As Shannon suggests, it's usually matching wood, but in this case, you may need to simply put a piece of wood there and then install tile or baseboard to cover it up.
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Aaron
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Re: Moving bathroom sink plumbing to the shared or common wall

Post by Aaron » Fri Nov 16, 2018 11:17 pm

Just a little detail I noticed: the red and blue pex in your cabinet I assume are for hot and cold supply respectively. Typically hot is always on the left and cold on the right.

You can easily correct the reversal inside the vanity by crossing over the supply lines from the faucet to the shut-offs. Maybe you did this already.

Also, my opinion with bath tile? I seriously love the good old traditional square ceramic glazed or satin-smooth tiles that are like 3/8" thick. They are drop-dead easy to install and so cheap you can do all your walls floor to ceiling. The spacers are built into the tiles as bumps, and you use non-sanded grout which is way easier to deal with than sanded grout.

If I could re-tile my bath again it's what I'd have gone with.

DPFAST
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Re: Moving bathroom sink plumbing to the shared or common wall

Post by DPFAST » Sat Nov 17, 2018 12:32 am

Aaron wrote:
Fri Nov 16, 2018 11:17 pm
Just a little detail I noticed: the red and blue pex in your cabinet I assume are for hot and cold supply respectively. Typically hot is always on the left and cold on the right.

You can easily correct the reversal inside the vanity by crossing over the supply lines from the faucet to the shut-offs. Maybe you did this already.

Also, my opinion with bath tile? I seriously love the good old traditional square ceramic glazed or satin-smooth tiles that are like 3/8" thick. They are drop-dead easy to install and so cheap you can do all your walls floor to ceiling. T.he spacers are built into the tiles as bumps, and you use non-sanded grout which is way easier to deal with than sanded grout.

If I could re-tile my bath again it's what I'd have gone with.
Yes, I did cross the water lines inside the cabinet. As you can see in the picture the red marked water line connected to the red PEX line. Since I ran the lines from the wall on the left side of the vanity under the vanity I did not wanted to cross the lines under the cabinet.

I also like these ceramic tiles, but my wife likes the small little squares on the sheet of plastic. The challenge is too find the colors we both like and that would go with the bathroom. I think I have to find a some other store besides the Home Depot for more options.

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A. Spruce
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Re: Moving bathroom sink plumbing to the shared or common wall

Post by A. Spruce » Sat Nov 17, 2018 2:07 am

Don't know what kind of places you have, Dal-tile is a VERY common brand, carried by most big boxes. If you are in or near a major city, they probably have a retail outlet near you. Word of warning, if you go to a tile supplier, you will be inundated with choices you never dreamed of, so tread cautiously! ;) :mrgreen:
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Aaron
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Re: Moving bathroom sink plumbing to the shared or common wall

Post by Aaron » Sat Nov 17, 2018 2:17 pm

My square ceramic tiles are by no means trendy... they are about as generic and institutional as all get out. I like them because of the ease of installation (they cut like BUTTER), and the sheer practicality of them. They are much better than a bathroom left untiled, too, simply for moisture mitigation and for sanitary reasons.

DPFAST
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Re: Moving bathroom sink plumbing to the shared or common wall

Post by DPFAST » Mon Nov 19, 2018 2:54 pm

A. Spruce wrote:
Sat Nov 17, 2018 2:07 am
Don't know what kind of places you have, Dal-tile is a VERY common brand, carried by most big boxes. If you are in or near a major city, they probably have a retail outlet near you. Word of warning, if you go to a tile supplier, you will be inundated with choices you never dreamed of, so tread cautiously! ;) :mrgreen:
Thanks Spruce. Yes I did go to Home Depot and Menards but I returned several samples back to the store after putting them on the wall for testing the colors. I am not sure what I want. I am thinking of the sheets of smaller tiles so I wouldn't have to cut as much since the back wall is 60 inches and some of the sheets are 12x12 or 11.75x11.75 . I will definitely choose something this week. Question:

Since I temporarily caulked the gap between the back wall and the vanity top will the silicon have to be removed before placing a tile on the wall or can I leave it alone?

DPFAST
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Re: Moving bathroom sink plumbing to the shared or common wall

Post by DPFAST » Mon Nov 19, 2018 2:59 pm

Aaron wrote:
Sat Nov 17, 2018 2:17 pm
My square ceramic tiles are by no means trendy... they are about as generic and institutional as all get out. I like them because of the ease of installation (they cut like BUTTER), and the sheer practicality of them. They are much better than a bathroom left untiled, too, simply for moisture mitigation and for sanitary reasons.
I am not actually looking for anything trendy as the vanity I got is more classy than trendy in my opinion but definitely wanna pick something that is more of a color of the bathroom and not white as I already have enough white from floor tiles to the doors. I definitely have to make my decision this week. Thanks Aaron

DPFAST
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Re: Moving bathroom sink plumbing to the shared or common wall

Post by DPFAST » Mon Nov 19, 2018 3:21 pm

So I decided to do my lower baseboard panels today. I got couple of 16 feet 3.75 inch wide MDF White panels and finished my white baseboards finally.
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First I couldn't figure out how to measure for 45 angle on my miter saw but after destroying couple of feet of panels I got it.

I also siliconed the top and bottom of the connection as well as the meeting spots of the panels. I nailed it to the studs with my 18 gauge Nail gun and 2 inch nails. It feels pretty sturdy. The small nail holes I filled with white silicone so when On your knees you can see the darker spots but while standing you can not see anything.
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Around the cabinet including the floor I used brown silicone which required a lot cleaning but eventually got it almost OK with few regrets but you can't see anything while standing up. I did the brown silicone as I was able to find a nice Toe Kick at Home Depot that was little darker than my vanity but being on the bottom it looks very natural to me.
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Now I have to paint the doors and the door frames as with the white baseboards the doors look so dirty and yellowish from being very old. I've never painted a doors. What type of paint to use? Do I prepare the doors for painting somehow or just give it good clean and prime and paint"? Any advice?

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A. Spruce
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Re: Moving bathroom sink plumbing to the shared or common wall

Post by A. Spruce » Mon Nov 19, 2018 3:32 pm

DPFAST wrote:
Mon Nov 19, 2018 3:21 pm
Now I have to paint the doors and the door frames as with the white baseboards the doors look so dirty and yellowish from being very old. I've never painted a doors. What type of paint to use? Do I prepare the doors for painting somehow or just give it good clean and prime and paint"? Any advice?
Wash the door and jamb down with TSP and a scrubby sponge, this will clean dirt and grease from the surfaces and etch them ready for paint. If the paint is significantly yellowed, it may be oil base, in which case you should prime it first, the BE123 will work fine. Follow with top coat of your choice, two coats of both the primer and paint will give you the best results.
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DPFAST
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Re: Moving bathroom sink plumbing to the shared or common wall

Post by DPFAST » Mon Nov 19, 2018 4:36 pm

A. Spruce wrote:
Mon Nov 19, 2018 3:32 pm

Wash the door and jamb down with TSP and a scrubby sponge, this will clean dirt and grease from the surfaces and etch them ready for paint. If the paint is significantly yellowed, it may be oil base, in which case you should prime it first, the BE123 will work fine. Follow with top coat of your choice, two coats of both the primer and paint will give you the best results.
So what type of paint should I use, oil based again or is there any other types that are easier to paint, less smelly and wash well for the doors?

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Aaron
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Re: Moving bathroom sink plumbing to the shared or common wall

Post by Aaron » Mon Nov 19, 2018 11:01 pm

I recommend a bright white acrylic enamel. It lays on sort of thick, so you have to use fast, broad strokes with it or it will sag. Don't overwork it... just brush it on fast and move on to another area. The first coat doesn't look great. But two coats looks beautiful. Use a really good quality sash brush for it (like Purdy or Wooster), like a 1.5" or 2" size.

Like Spruce I also recommend Bull's Eye 1-2-3 for the primer, it's a good foundation coat. It never hurts to prime, and is the best insurance for an expensive topcoat.

The paint cleans up nicely... I use a small tub of warm dish soapy water with a splash of ammonia. Use a brush comb to really work out the paint vigorously on both sides, then rinse the brush thoroughly. Hang it from an S-hook to dry.

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A. Spruce
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Re: Moving bathroom sink plumbing to the shared or common wall

Post by A. Spruce » Tue Nov 20, 2018 12:31 am

While doors do take quite a bit of abuse, I've never had issues painting them with semi-gloss latex paints. Acrylic enamels are latex based, but dry a bit harder. Alkyd paints are a replacement of oil based paints, they may or may not be latex based, which only matters during clean-up.

When I paint doors, I usually use a 3" or 4" roller to apply the material, then lay it off with a 3" sash brush. Sash brushes have the angled tip. How much you can work the paint depends on how fast it dries on you, some paints flash very quickly, so you don't have much time to get them on and laid off, slow dry times gives you ample time to get it on and laid off. You might want to watch a few you tube videos on how to paint doors, as video explanations are easier to understand than the written word alone.

Ditto on the quality brush Purdy is my brand of choice. Dealers often have private labeled brushes from Purdy. Match the brush to the paint being used, most of the time this isn't an issue, but it warrants putting that out there. Clean-up also is determined by the product being used, so you might want to clarify that with the dealer as well if you are not certain.
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