T-moulding transition installation

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gsahlot
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T-moulding transition installation

Post by gsahlot » Tue Jan 01, 2019 10:25 pm

Hi,

I am installing laminate flooring and now I am near to the door of bathroom. Currently the bathroom has vinyl flooring but eventually (maybe in a year or two) I would like to get the bathroom remodeled and install tiles flooring (instead of current vinyl) so sort of need to keep that in mind too. But overall I want to install T-moulding for transition in such a way that it look good enough now and also doesn't need to be disturbed when in future we get the bathroom remodeled. So how can I best install it? Where exactly it needs to be placed relative to the depth of door jamb, like should it be completely outside of the door when closed or completely inside or right under?

Here are some pics attached.
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floor_transitioning2.jpg
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floor_transitioning1.jpg
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A. Spruce
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Re: T-moulding transition installation

Post by A. Spruce » Wed Jan 02, 2019 12:02 am

As you can see, the flooring transition goes under the door. Unfortunately, going from wood to vinyl requires a reducer molding, not a T molding. T moldings are also not self supporting, both arms of the T rest upon the flooring, the leg dangles in between, most of the time, which means you can't just put a T where a reducer should be and expect it to look good or hold up.

If it were me, I would buy the T molding now, along with a reducer and install the reducer for the time being. When you get around to doing the tile, you'll have the T on hand, in matching stock, to replace the reducer with.
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Shannon
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Re: T-moulding transition installation

Post by Shannon » Wed Jan 02, 2019 7:47 am

Yup I would agree with Spruce.
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gsahlot
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Re: T-moulding transition installation

Post by gsahlot » Thu Jan 03, 2019 1:38 am

Thanks Spruce and Shannon! I guess I know more now that T moulding is not the universal fit for all situations. Does reducer have specific sizes or is it standard size I can ask for like a reducer from laminate to vinyl floor?

Also few more questions coming to the mind:

1. When I have the tiles installed in the bathroom, would laminate floor and tiles will come to the same level i.e. would T-moulding fit in that case?

2. I want to expand/continue the laminate flooring into the kitchen area from living room. Right now the kitchen has this weirdly looking floor (see picture)
kitchenfloor1.jpg
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I am not sure what type of floor is this. Since I want to continue the laminate floor into the kitchen, I would like to remove this floor but this floor seems to have a layer under it. It seems to be some kind of underlayment which is stuck to the subfloor with adhesive, see picture.
kitchenfloorunderlayment.jpg
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So my question is do I need to remove this underlayment as well? or can I just put my underlayment (for laminate flooring) on top of this already stuck underlayment? I think it might cause some leveling issue though.

3. I see the same sort of underlayment in bathroom, see picture
bathroomfloorunderlayment.jpg
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When I do the tiles in bathroom, would I need to remove this underlayment or can I put tiles right on top of this underlayment?

Also, in general what options do I have for flooring inside the bathroom? I don't like the tiles with grout as the grout becomes dirty and hard to clean, but I don't like the vinyl either, so I am looking for maybe tiles with pretty much invisible grouts.

Thanks!

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Shannon
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Re: T-moulding transition installation

Post by Shannon » Thu Jan 03, 2019 8:50 am

#1. Reducers do come in a couple of sizes usually but not always. Depends on the flooring and supplier. It is very doubtful that the tiles and laminate will end up flush to each other, the tile will most likely be higher.

#2. You have a sheet vinyl flooring installed over likely a 1/4" subfloor and old linoleum flooring in kitchen and vinyl sheet flooring over linoleum in the bathroom. With out removing them completely you will have a bump at the change between the two rooms. The sheet vinyl and the sub flooring should come up pretty easy but that old linoleum will not usually come up easy and many of them had asbestos. I would remove the vinyl sheet flooring and any wood sub flooring that is maybe under it then if the old lino is ok then I would use some floor patch to make a transition in the door ways from the old wood floor to the lino. It will be less noticeable of a bump that way and you can floor right over it. Other option is installing a floor transition T mould in the door ways, that should work with such a thin difference in floor heights.

#3. I'm not sure if you could tile over that Lino in the bathroom or not? I'm not a fan of adding more layers over layers so I don't do it if I can avoid it at all.
A different option other then tiles would be to use a vinyl tile (LVT) or vinyl plank (LVP) flooring in the bathroom. It installs much like the laminate you are already doing but is all vinyl and is not bothered by moisture.
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A. Spruce
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Re: T-moulding transition installation

Post by A. Spruce » Thu Jan 03, 2019 3:07 pm

gsahlot wrote:
Thu Jan 03, 2019 1:38 am
Thanks Spruce and Shannon! I guess I know more now that T moulding is not the universal fit for all situations. Does reducer have specific sizes or is it standard size I can ask for like a reducer from laminate to vinyl floor?

Generally, whatever flooring brand you're buying will have their own moldings that match the flooring. It's best to use manufacturer moldings because they will match color, grain, and texture of the flooring you buy. If there are no manufacturer moldings available, then you will have to find an alternative. There is no "standard" size, shape, or form for moldings, but they are all very very similar, regardless of brand/manufacturer, so crossing brands or going generic usually isn't a big deal.

Also few more questions coming to the mind:

1. When I have the tiles installed in the bathroom, would laminate floor and tiles will come to the same level i.e. would T-moulding fit in that case?

It is unlikely that the laminate and tile will plane at the same level because tile normally has a backer board, whereas laminate does not. So, 3/8 to 1/2" for the backer and another 1/4" to 1/2" for the tile, depending on what you choose. Tile mastic will also add to the thickness. Laminate is usually directly laid on subfloor, sometimes it will have an underlayment, not always. If you absolutely must have them on equal planes, then you need to know exactly what the thickness is of each of their respective components and then add underlayment to raise the thinner material. In reality, a minor difference of 1/4" to 3/8" in height won't be aesthetically noticeable and hardly noticed under the bare foot.

2. I want to expand/continue the laminate flooring into the kitchen area from living room. Right now the kitchen has this weirdly looking floor (see picture)
kitchenfloor1.jpg
I am not sure what type of floor is this. Since I want to continue the laminate floor into the kitchen, I would like to remove this floor but this floor seems to have a layer under it. It seems to be some kind of underlayment which is stuck to the subfloor with adhesive, see picture.
kitchenfloorunderlayment.jpg
So my question is do I need to remove this underlayment as well? or can I just put my underlayment (for laminate flooring) on top of this already stuck underlayment? I think it might cause some leveling issue though.

3. I see the same sort of underlayment in bathroom, see picture
bathroomfloorunderlayment.jpg
When I do the tiles in bathroom, would I need to remove this underlayment or can I put tiles right on top of this underlayment?

What you're seeing there is multiple layers of vinyl and/or linoeum, similar but different products. IMHO, you definitely want to remove them and make sure that your subfloor is the same plane throughout all areas where the laminate will be. Differences in height are going to be noticed by both the eye and the foot, and they do not look or feel good.

As Shannon points out, there could be asbestos present in the linoleum and the mastic holding it down. If you are concerned with this, have them tested before you disturb them. If you're lucky, there is an underlayment between it and the subfloor so removing it in larger chunks will be possible. In my experience, most sheet goods are laid over particle board underlayment, so removal isn't too horrendous. If it's directly on your subfloor then you'll have some serious work on your hands, it may be easier to lay cheap vinyl thorughout, so you have a uniform surface to install your laminate on.


Also, in general what options do I have for flooring inside the bathroom? I don't like the tiles with grout as the grout becomes dirty and hard to clean, but I don't like the vinyl either, so I am looking for maybe tiles with pretty much invisible grouts.

Grout is pretty easy to keep clean, so long as you seal it really good before you start using it. Also, household steam cleaners are very reasonably priced and are fantastic for cleaning grout and tile and many other uses around the house.

IMO, there are actually some pretty nice vinyls out there to choose from. Go to a flooring retailer who doesn't hide what they sell (many hide the labels so you can't price shop). Use a contractor grade supplier (not a big box or boutique shop), there you will find all kinds of things, often these companies have remnants that are significantly discounted. Remnants can be the end of a roll that hasn't sold or pieces left over from an install, they are still new product and a great way to save some money.

As for other flooring options, tile or vinyl really are the best choices for a wet environment like a bathroom. Maybe you can find a vinyl plank that closely matches the laminate you're installing elsewhere so that you don't really have a transition point at the door. The thing is, though, you either want a dead nutz accurate match or you want to completely contrast, otherwise it will not look good.
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gsahlot
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Re: T-moulding transition installation

Post by gsahlot » Thu Jan 03, 2019 9:47 pm

Thanks Guys!

Hmm. So this asbestos thingy.. do you think the job to remove linoeum/mastic could make asbestos air-borne? Looks like it is wont be a dusty job like removing popcorn ceiling and sanding it.

gsahlot
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Re: T-moulding transition installation

Post by gsahlot » Thu Jan 03, 2019 9:50 pm

Also, in case of kitchen floor, is it not possible to use the stuck linoeum layer as underlayment for the laminate floor which I want to extend into the kitchen from living room? In living room I am already using an underlayment (pergo gold) under the laminate floor, so I am thinking the level after putting the underlayment in living room floor would be pretty much same/similar to the level in kitchen after removing vinyl but leaving the linoeum layer stuck to the house's subfloor?

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A. Spruce
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Re: T-moulding transition installation

Post by A. Spruce » Thu Jan 03, 2019 11:49 pm

While asbestos is nothing to be trifled with, I don't believe it to be the boogieman that it's made out to be. The only time asbestos is a risk is when it is friable, something that testing will confirm as well. You still want to minimize the creation of dust. Preferably you would tarp off the area with negative ventilation, meaning you want to suck the air out of the room/exhaust it outside, this prevents the spread of dust throughout the house and work area.

As for removing the vinyl and leaving the lino, this isn't likely unless the vinyl is only perimeter glued. If so, you can easily remove the vinyl without destruction of the lino and without mastic remaining, except for around the perimeter, which shouldn't be too bad to deal with. If it is full glued vinyl, then it truly will be easier to pull everything, which is why you hopefully have an underlayment and not glued directly to the subfloor.

Since you're already working next to these areas with the laminate, I would do some minor exploratory surgery at the transition point to see if there is indeed underlayment. If so, get under it with crowbars and start ripping and tearing. If not, I would be inclined to leave both layers of sheet goods and build up under the laminate so that it will transition across the vinyl without notice.
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gsahlot
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Re: T-moulding transition installation

Post by gsahlot » Fri Jan 04, 2019 12:30 am

Good news. Looks like the top most layer is 1/4" proper tiles, I guess that means non vinyl stuff. As I can see that they have locking system and I can easily put a prybar and lift them up so I think I can just start on one side and unlock them and take out without any efforts. So this means I am just left with this paper/underlayment layer which might have asbestos which I am thinking I can probably leave as is and use that as underlayment for future laminate flooring in the kitchen?
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IMG_20190103_222154.jpg
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A. Spruce
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Re: T-moulding transition installation

Post by A. Spruce » Fri Jan 04, 2019 12:33 am

Yes, you may be able to leave the lino layer.
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Shannon
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Re: T-moulding transition installation

Post by Shannon » Fri Jan 04, 2019 9:18 am

actually looks like there is two layers of lino under that vinyl?
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gsahlot
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Re: T-moulding transition installation

Post by gsahlot » Sun Jan 13, 2019 12:45 pm

Yeah, looks like are two. I am feeling that the green one might be easier to take out. It looks a crispy one and quite thin.

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