Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

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rchesterton
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Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

Post by rchesterton » Sat Feb 16, 2019 5:59 pm

Last year I installed a window on first floor of the gable end of my house. Now, I am going to put another window in but this time it will be on the second floor and on the eave side (I think that is the opposite of gable, right?). I am wondering if there are any load-bearing specifics that I need to be aware of and account for since this wall carries a different load than the gable end wall did. Or, would I follow the same general principles when framing the window? It looks like there used to be a window in this space, actually. I think they must have removed it because the addition has vaulted ceilings and the peak of the roof is right where it looks like the old window used to be (opposite side of the wall in this picture).

As you can see, I cut a hole already where the window will be going. I just want to make sure that I frame it properly and if there are any framing rules that pertain to the eave side wall that I follow them.

By the way, check out the bee hive I found in the wall when I removed the drywall. I wonder how many other places we have bees hiding out.
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A. Spruce
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Re: Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

Post by A. Spruce » Sat Feb 16, 2019 6:09 pm

If you are going to stay within the confines of the existing header space, no worries, if you are going to widen the window, then you will need to add a larger header, which may require adding a temporary support wall.
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rchesterton
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Re: Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

Post by rchesterton » Sat Feb 16, 2019 6:44 pm

I cannot use that old framed out window space because there is now an addition with vaulted ceilings which caused the peak of the roof to intrude on the window that used to be there. I will be framing it completely new where (in my picture) you see there is a square cut out. I just did not know if there was anything I needed to be careful of when framing on the eave wall. Looking at that old framed out area, it seemed lazy to me (some of the things they did) so I didn't trust just looking at that for reference.

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A. Spruce
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Re: Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

Post by A. Spruce » Sat Feb 16, 2019 7:42 pm

How many studs do you have to cut to fit the window?
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rchesterton
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Re: Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

Post by rchesterton » Sat Feb 16, 2019 8:05 pm

I'll have to cut 3 studs to fit

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Re: Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

Post by A. Spruce » Sat Feb 16, 2019 9:31 pm

I think you'll be fine to just cut the studs and install your header. If you're worried about support, install your header king studs before you cut the other studs, the kings will give you enough support while you're installing the header. Slip in the header, install the cripples and the header is done. Then install your sill and cripples under the sill and you'll be done!
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rchesterton
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Re: Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

Post by rchesterton » Sun Feb 17, 2019 7:01 am

Thanks! Just didn't want to run into any rules for walls that were "more" load bearing than others. But it seems that all external walls are created and treated equally! I appreciate it.

DanM
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Re: Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

Post by DanM » Sun Feb 17, 2019 7:44 am

One thing to add, don't forget that load points need to be transferred all the way to the foundation. So you'll need to open up the wall and ceiling on the first floor and basement directly below that window to add blocks and studs.

Usually what I do is put a pair of nails through the sub-floor a few inches in front of the king and jack studs (so I can tell where they are when I'm down below and can't see them).

-In the 2nd storey sub-floor you need to add blocks to carry the load from the king & jack stud above. They'll sit on top of the wall, you need as many blocks as you have king + jack studs.

-Then in the first storey wall you need to add studs below the blocks you just put in. Same number of studs as the number of blocks you just put in.

-Then in the 1st storey sub-floor you need to add blocks just like you did for the 2nd storey sub-floor.

-If your first storey sub-floor sits directly on the foundation you're done, but if it's sitting on a knee wall which sits on the foundation you need to add studs into the knee wall as well.

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Shannon
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Re: Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

Post by Shannon » Sun Feb 17, 2019 8:43 am

For a simple 4 foot window with only roof eave load I don't think that is completely necessary to direct the support right to the foundation. If this was supporting maybe a 8' opening or a roof ridge or direct point load then yes. IMO the combination of the floor rim joist below and the bottom plate and double top plates of the walls will more then do the job here. The only other concern may be if you are placing the new opening over a wide opening in the wall below and your new opening is placing a point load on a now under sized headed?
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DanM
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Re: Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

Post by DanM » Sun Feb 17, 2019 9:03 am

It's definitely not going to collapse or anything, but it can still sag there and crack the drywall below the window. Around here every window needs to be supported all the way to the foundation, even tiny little 2ft wide windows on the gable side that are barely holding any weight. If you don't it's a guaranteed fail on the framing inspection.

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Re: Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

Post by A. Spruce » Sun Feb 17, 2019 11:21 am

Good points Dan, you're right, point loads "should" be carried down to the foundation, and depending on jurisdiction, as you mention, the requirements may demand it.

In this case, I'm with Shannon, that the existing structure is sufficient to carry this window without future issues. At the very most I might add blocking to the joist bays below the king studs, which will spread the load across a larger area below. Shannon's point of the kings landing over a header below is also a good one. With the addition that is attached to this wall, there is added weight and structural issues, but I'm betting that the wall was already upgraded to support the needs addition so it will be fine for this window.
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Shannon
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Re: Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

Post by Shannon » Sun Feb 17, 2019 11:51 am

DanM wrote:
Sun Feb 17, 2019 9:03 am
It's definitely not going to collapse or anything, but it can still sag there and crack the drywall below the window. Around here every window needs to be supported all the way to the foundation, even tiny little 2ft wide windows on the gable side that are barely holding any weight. If you don't it's a guaranteed fail on the framing inspection.
You have to follow what your local area requires for sure. A 2ft. opening is pretty extreme the 2x8 or 2x10 rim joist will carry that no problem.
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rchesterton
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Re: Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

Post by rchesterton » Mon Feb 18, 2019 7:36 am

So far, here's what I've done. Not the best picture because you cannot see the bottom but it gives you the idea. I used a 2x6 for the header and doubled the jacks. What do you mean by blocks or blocking?
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rchesterton
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Re: Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

Post by rchesterton » Mon Feb 18, 2019 7:37 am

Directly below is a solid exterior wall - the opening to the addition (downstairs) is way to the right - there are no doors or windows in line with this window below.

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Re: Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

Post by Shannon » Mon Feb 18, 2019 7:56 am

To me why you have is fine. You actually did not need the doubled jacks in this case. It seems to me that you need doubles after the header length exceeds 10' ? I cant seem to find it in my code book though?
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Re: Window Framing on Eave side vs Gable Side

Post by A. Spruce » Mon Feb 18, 2019 11:52 am

rchesterton wrote:
Mon Feb 18, 2019 7:36 am
So far, here's what I've done. Not the best picture because you cannot see the bottom but it gives you the idea. I used a 2x6 for the header and doubled the jacks. What do you mean by blocks or blocking?
That looks fine. As Shannon said, there wasn't a need to double the jacks or cripples, but there is not harm in doing so either.

As for the blocks I was referring to, they would be installed between the floor joists directly under the king and jack studs to spread the point load across a wider area. I do not believe them to be necessary in this instance.
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