Da 'Burb

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Aaron
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Re: Da 'Burb

Post by Aaron » Fri Sep 06, 2019 5:54 am

This is the problem I'd have with a trailer.

https://youtu.be/2oq0YNo02KM

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Shannon
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Re: Da 'Burb

Post by Shannon » Fri Sep 06, 2019 8:10 am

after having one for a bit you would figure it out for sure. Also the shorter the trailer the more difficult to back it up.
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Shannon
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Re: Da 'Burb

Post by Shannon » Fri Sep 06, 2019 8:21 am

A. Spruce wrote:
Thu Sep 05, 2019 8:09 pm
This setup has always worked well for me. I can carry most of the tools I need for daily use, plus just enough "emergency" supplies to be able to tackle many unexpected things without a trip to the store or loading my specialty tools and supplies.

For instance, I always had a length of 14/2 and 12/2 wire on board, as well as plenty of wire nuts and that sort of thing, but, if I knew I was going to be doing electrical work, then I'd load up my electrical supplies for that day or segment of the job. Same concept for fasteners, I've always got a supply of just about everything, but certainly not enough to frame a room addition or build a deck or drywall an entire project.

I can absolutely see, as a specialty contractor, the need for a job trailer to be able to have all the specific needs of your trade close at hand. As a general contractor, I've just never needed to have THAT much stuff on a job at any one time. I create daily lists of materials and tools that I need to bring for the next day's work. If I need more than that, it's usually time to call in a sub-contractor for the job. :mrgreen: On that note, hey Shannon, what's your phone number?!??! :| ;) ;) :mrgreen:
Im kinda opposite ,I hire very few subs and on bigger projects i need everything at some point. I like having what i need as far as tools on site as much as possible. I guess maybe I'm lazy or don't plan well enough at times so its nice to have everything there so I have what I need even if something comes up I was not planning for that day. It also gives me quick storage when the job site does not have the space I need to keep stuff in the house all the while.
I have job specific tool boxes (electrical, drywalling,plumbing) but they are bigger rolling style and I really got tired of lifting these in out of vans or truck box. My ramp door on the back folds down and getting stuff in and out is much easier on the back and even just walking in and out is easier. The side door I have been considering adding a fold out RV type step under it cause even that is getting to be a bit hard on the knees stepping in and out at times.
Just driving around in the truck all the time would be more convenient but I'm used to the trailer being towed half the time so its no big deal to me.
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A. Spruce
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Re: Da 'Burb

Post by A. Spruce » Fri Sep 06, 2019 8:56 am

I'm proficient with trailers, a little rusty maybe, but I can put one where I want it. Growing up on a ranch you learn how to do such things at an early age. I had to laugh, I worked at a dairy as a teenager and they used hay wagons to bring in hay from the field and everyone there would tell me "you can't back up a wagon!", so I tried it once, got it with no problem, and it was also behind a Johnny Popper at the time, for added level of difficulty. :mrgreen: It could be done, they were just inept, or took driving lessons from Peter! :lol:
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A. Spruce
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Re: Da 'Burb

Post by A. Spruce » Fri Sep 06, 2019 9:00 am

I definitely like having subs, both for when I get in over my head and for when I really don't want to do something, like crawling under a house or through an attic to run pipes or wires. Especially now where I plan work smarter and not harder. Leave the hard stuff to the youngsters. :twisted: :lol:
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Shannon
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Re: Da 'Burb

Post by Shannon » Sat Sep 07, 2019 8:25 am

Ya a hay wagon with the pivoting front axle is more difficult for sure.

Around here waiting for subs can really slow things down, I get easily frustrated by that. I hate for my customers to be inconvenienced for too long. I hear what you say about smarter not harder. I have started getting much choosier on the jobs i'm willing to take.
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A. Spruce
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Re: Da 'Burb

Post by A. Spruce » Sat Sep 07, 2019 9:28 am

When I put jobs out to bid for subs I also find out if their schedule is going to conflict or align with my job schedule, that way we're not waiting around. It doesn't always work out as planned, but it does most of the time. I also find high quality subs with work ethics equal to or greater than mine so that I don't have to worry about the quality of work being done.
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DanM
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Re: Da 'Burb

Post by DanM » Tue Sep 10, 2019 3:10 pm

Subs are the bane of my existence these days. For the past year probably 75% of what I do has been being the fix'it guy. The subdivision we work in has so many houses on the go that my boss had no choice but to bring some in. Some are better than others but most of them are sub-par. Did I ever mention how much I **HATE** fixing other peoples terrible shoddy work. Especially since it takes me 3x as long to fix something as it would've done to just do it right in the first place.

Last two weeks I was doing the back framing in a house some dummy built and I spent more time fixing things than actually doing my backing work. I'm pretty sure they leveled their walls with a 2" torpedo level or something. I had to re-level every single wall in the house, some where just brutal too, like one wall was almost 2" off level. They also like to put 1/2 a box of nails into everything even though we've told them not to (it messes me up when I have to straighten everything after).

Then the windows showed up and it's my job to put them in, and of course more than half the openings in the house were wrong even though when I chalk the houses I mark all the windows/doors on the ground with the lumber crayon. I mark everything for them, like the height the R.O. starts at, the vertical opening, the width, how many plies the header needs to be, whether or not the headers is 2x10s or LVLs. A monkey build that wall properly you just have to be able to read a few basic things.

That's basically my experience doing backing at the houses built by most of the subs. Every single effing time lol. There's way more mistakes than I'm mentioning, it's absolutely incredible how stupid some people can be. The problem is we're so busy we just need bodies building things because it's so nuts. The homebuilder wants 10ish single houses and 2 townhouse blocks (4 units each) framed per month until at least 2021, maybe 2022. I really miss when I just built houses myself, and we had a 'you mess it up you fix it' policy. My boss has tried to make the subs come fix their s**t but they're just too stupid, and they just make it worse and it screws up the deadlines. It's easier for me to fix it all and write down how many man-hours it takes so he can back-charge them for the repairs.

We legit had a sub (who's since been fired) who actually got backcharged so much for one house he screwed up so badly in so many ways that he would've gotten a negative paycheck for it.

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A. Spruce
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Re: Da 'Burb

Post by A. Spruce » Tue Sep 10, 2019 3:39 pm

Yeah, subs like that rarely make it onto one of my jobs and they sure as heck won't be sticking around for a second chance if they do. I get that the industry is going nuts in your area and finding good labor or subs is a tough thing to do, but if the quality of worker isn't there, then your boss needs to scale back on the amount of work he takes. Ultimately, the crap work these guys are doing reflects on your company, and it's really hard to change someone's mind when they've seen or heard bad things about you.
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Aaron
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Re: Da 'Burb

Post by Aaron » Tue Sep 10, 2019 4:20 pm

DanM wrote:
Tue Sep 10, 2019 3:10 pm
Did I ever mention how much I **HATE** fixing other peoples terrible shoddy work. Especially since it takes me 3x as long to fix something as it would've done to just do it right in the first place.
oh god yes. When a job is started it needs to be completed by the same person (preferably competently!) to completion.

I used to work at the telco, and since I worked evenings, I would sometimes finish wiring in the circuits of daytime techs couldn't get done by the end of their shift. They would show me the engineering, and be like, "Ok, I put this jumper in, but not this one. But I did this one over here, and not that one."

I was like save your breath. I will figure it out and it will work. Much easier to rip out their jumpers and just rerun everything fresh. Because I *know* mine are correct, and I tested my circuits to guarantee my work!

As far as fixing shoddy work? Well if the circuit the other techs put in fails, well I get paid by the hour to fix it...

DanM
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Re: Da 'Burb

Post by DanM » Tue Sep 10, 2019 6:23 pm

A. Spruce wrote:
Tue Sep 10, 2019 3:39 pm
Yeah, subs like that rarely make it onto one of my jobs and they sure as heck won't be sticking around for a second chance if they do. I get that the industry is going nuts in your area and finding good labor or subs is a tough thing to do, but if the quality of worker isn't there, then your boss needs to scale back on the amount of work he takes. Ultimately, the crap work these guys are doing reflects on your company, and it's really hard to change someone's mind when they've seen or heard bad things about you.
'Problem' with that is my company has an exclusive contract framing this subdivision for this homebuilder. They (the homebuilder) aren't allowed to bring in different framers, which overall is great. We've been doing this subdivision exclusively since it started almost 15 years ago. It's guaranteed big money and saying you can't handle the workload isn't really an option unless my bosses want to lose that exclusive contract which obviously they don't. Their Dad started working for this homebuilder maybe 40 years ago or something so there's a good relationship and they know it'll get done properly and on time. The only real option right now is to get subs in building stuff even if they're sub-par. Then you've just walk through the houses, find all the mistakes, and then fix 'em so things get done before the deadlines.

I just wish it didn't become my job to be the fix-it guy. I can't stand doing it but I've been around long enough and know how my boss likes things done, what the homebuilder finds acceptable, etc. The two other supervisors we have are good but they don't know the back framing part of things as well as me (like stairs, straightening walls, and all the stupid little odds and ends that need to get done). I kinda just am the default logical choice.
Aaron wrote:
Tue Sep 10, 2019 4:20 pm
As far as fixing shoddy work? Well if the circuit the other techs put in fails, well I get paid by the hour to fix it...
Ya I still get paid to fix it too it's not the end of the world. I did get a raise to become the fix it guy since it's a big responsibility but god sometimes I think I'd take a pay cut just to go back to building stuff and that's it. My job was a lot less stressful and way more straightforward.

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