Framing walls inside partially sub-grade workshop

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jsamhall
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Framing walls inside partially sub-grade workshop

Post by jsamhall » Thu Oct 03, 2019 10:09 am

Hello,

Firstly I'd like to start by thanking Shannon for the awesome YouTube videos and this forum from which I've learned so much!

Last year we had a workshop erected on our property. In order to save some money I had the contractor leave the inside of the building unfinished (e.g., no insulation in the walls, no sheetrock, etc.). The building is built into a grade so one side has a 10" thick frost wall (left side in the photo) and the back-side of the building steps down with the grade. Here's a photo of the inside so you can see what I'm describing:
Image

Before the slab was poured, I installed the green 2" foamboard you see in the photo which runs down to the footings & 2" foam board under the slap in order to achieve a continuous insulation envelope. I also capped all the cement foundation walls with 2" foam board which can kinda be seen in the above photo but probably easier to see in this photo.

I am now preparing to frame 2x4 walls in front of the foam board and have a couple of questions before I get started. To be clear, none of these walls are structural; I am building them for the purposes of additional insulation, running electrical, and hanging sheetrock.

For the back stepped wall, I plan on breaking it down into 3 sections and building them individually on the floor, standing them up and anchoring them down to the slab one by one, then nailing each of the abutted end studs together. I'm wondering if this order is correct, or should I anchor them to the slab as the last step?

As for anchoring the bottom plates to the slab, I intend on using Simpson Strong Drive 1/4"-3" split drive anchors every few feet plus one a few inches in from the end of each bottom plate (so probably 4 or 5 anchors per wall section). For the wall on the left side of the photo I plan on building it in 8' sections that I can stand up by myself and nailing the end studs together just like the stepped wall. Are there any arguments against this approach? I understand an alternative would be to install the bottom plate first and toe nail all the studs in place, then install the top plate last but I feel like this would be a lot more difficult given the wall is not going up to the ceiling so the studs wouldn't want to stand up straight.

Next question... since the foam board sticks out a bit from the exterior wall framing (again, can be kind of seen in this photo, I have some stuff sitting on the top of the foam board cap), I intend on building the 2x4 walls slightly taller than the foam board in order to have a pathway to run electrical down from the exterior walls (via the attic) into the 2x4 walls. In order to secure the 2x4 walls to the concrete foundation walls, I intend on adding blocking every 3rd stud anchored to the concrete via 5" hex-drive tapcon screws (yielding 1-1/2" of engagement in the concrete), then nailing the studs to the blocking. Is this the preferred method?

As an alternative to securing the studs to blocking fastened to the concrete with tapcons, I've considered nailing a 2x4 to the exterior wall framing, then building my 2x4 walls so that the top plate is level with that 2x4, and bridging the two with a 2x8 or whatever is appropriate. This seems like it would be easier than drilling a ton of holes for tapcons but I'm unsure of any potential problems with this approach.

Thank you for your time and feedback!
Last edited by jsamhall on Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:09 am, edited 1 time in total.

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A. Spruce
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Re: Framing walls inside partially sub-grade workshop

Post by A. Spruce » Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:03 am

Framing the walls in manageable sections is perfectly fine. Use a treated sill plate. I would just run Tapcons through the sill into the floor and not worry about blocking the wall. If you have a gap between the new wall framing and the existing framing, cut a shim to the gap width, screw or nail it to the wall, then toe-nail the new wall into that.
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jsamhall
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Re: Framing walls inside partially sub-grade workshop

Post by jsamhall » Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:11 am

A. Spruce wrote:
Thu Oct 03, 2019 11:03 am
Framing the walls in manageable sections is perfectly fine. Use a treated sill plate. I would just run Tapcons through the sill into the floor and not worry about blocking the wall. If you have a gap between the new wall framing and the existing framing, cut a shim to the gap width, screw or nail it to the wall, then toe-nail the new wall into that.
What timing! I just edited my post after considering the idea of connecting the new 2x4 wall to the existing exterior wall framing. Definitely sounds easier than drilling a lot of holes for tapcons. Thanks for the feedback!

Just want to make sure I understand correctly -- you're suggesting something like this?
Image

I'd go an inch or so higher than in the photo as to allow room to route electrical down the exterior wall and into the new wall.

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A. Spruce
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Re: Framing walls inside partially sub-grade workshop

Post by A. Spruce » Thu Oct 03, 2019 1:38 pm

Yes, that is essentially what I was suggesting, but you could just as easily build your walls with matching stud locations of the existing wall, then screw blocking to the side of the old and new studs to hold the top of the wall. It would save the hassles of toe-nailing.
If the women don't find you handsome, they should at least find you handy.

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Shannon
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Re: Framing walls inside partially sub-grade workshop

Post by Shannon » Thu Oct 03, 2019 5:49 pm

I agree 100 percent with all options.
I would suggest that you forgo the drywall on the lower wall areas as it is easily damaged. It is a cheaper option then plywood or OSB but will not stand up to much abuse.
Nice shop BTW.
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jsamhall
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Re: Framing walls inside partially sub-grade workshop

Post by jsamhall » Mon Oct 21, 2019 6:25 am

Thanks for the input everyone! I've got the walls framed up now, just have a bit more work to do before I fasten them to the slab and exterior wall framing.

Thanks for the kind words re: shop!

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