Vinyl plank flooring questions

Ask your questions pertaining to the interior that don't fit in the above categories
Post Reply
Tas1800
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2017 1:44 am

Vinyl plank flooring questions

Post by Tas1800 » Wed Sep 13, 2017 1:53 am

Hi y'all, we have a modular home that has linoleum glued down in the dinning room and extends into kitchen. We have carpet in the living room that will be coming up. My question is, will you see/feel the slight transition from osb in the living room onto the very thin linoleum in the dinning room? It's all open between the two rooms and the planks will run about 22ft with the transition. Just not sure if that slight variation will keep the planks from locking together properly.


User avatar
Shannon
Posts: 8441
Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 11:58 pm
Location: Canada
Contact:

Re: Vinyl plank flooring questions

Post by Shannon » Wed Sep 13, 2017 8:38 am

If there is only one layer of linoleum then it should be no issue when running the new planks perpendicular to the transition line.There may be a slight bump but I would suspect it will be undetectable to the eye. If the edge of the linoleum is curled at all you will want to cut it back a few inches and remove the curled edge.If you think it will be a problem you could belt sand the edge of the lino tapering it to less of a transition. The problem with sanding it is most lino will have asbestos and sanding will make then air born. Asbestos is known to cause cancer and not all people are comfortable with being exposed.Using good respirators with proper filters and good dust control fans to exhaust it to the exterior are some of the ways to carefully work with it. Do be careful if you decide to sand it!
If you've found our videos or website information helpful, please considering pledging us on Patreon

User avatar
A. Spruce
Posts: 1984
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2016 5:23 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Vinyl plank flooring questions

Post by A. Spruce » Wed Sep 13, 2017 9:04 am

The variation likely won't affect installation or look of the new flooring but you will feel it. There will be a noticeable ridge where the transition point is. You can float it out a bit with floor leveling compound, but it's going to be there.

User avatar
Shannon
Posts: 8441
Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 11:58 pm
Location: Canada
Contact:

Re: Vinyl plank flooring questions

Post by Shannon » Wed Sep 13, 2017 10:41 pm

A. Spruce wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 9:04 am
The variation likely won't affect installation or look of the new flooring but you will feel it. There will be a noticeable ridge where the transition point is. You can float it out a bit with floor leveling compound, but it's going to be there.
That's a great idea, much better then sanding the old flooring.
If you've found our videos or website information helpful, please considering pledging us on Patreon

User avatar
A. Spruce
Posts: 1984
Joined: Tue Aug 16, 2016 5:23 pm
Location: California, USA

Re: Vinyl plank flooring questions

Post by A. Spruce » Wed Sep 13, 2017 11:00 pm

I had this same issue when I installed hardwood in my last house. My flooring guy suggested floating the transition, rather than stripping the vinyl, because it was easier and faster. I agreed at the time, but regretted it later because you could feel the slope in the flooring, even though it was floated out 3' or 4' from the edge of the vinyl. If I were to do it again, I'd strip the vinyl.

The only caveat I can think of for the OP is that if this is a modular home, the vinyl is probably glued directly to the subfloor, which will make it damn near impossible to remove without severe damage to the subfloor, so in this case, floating makes more sense. If the vinyl is on top of an underlayment, them removing the vinyl is the way to go.

User avatar
Shannon
Posts: 8441
Joined: Fri Nov 25, 2011 11:58 pm
Location: Canada
Contact:

Re: Vinyl plank flooring questions

Post by Shannon » Wed Sep 13, 2017 11:07 pm

Yes I would agree it is most likely glued directly to the plywood and removing it would be very labour intensive and likely leave damage to the plywood that would need fixing as well after.
If you've found our videos or website information helpful, please considering pledging us on Patreon

Post Reply