Baseboard heater for entrance? How many watts per room?

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jeb101
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Baseboard heater for entrance? How many watts per room?

Post by jeb101 » Tue Feb 06, 2018 12:03 pm

I am about to buy some Stelpro baseboard heaters for the house, as a backup source of heat in case the mini split dies or can't supply. Attached below is a super duper high quality mockup that took at most 3 minutes to do in paint to help you visualize.
mmYL0Hv.png
mmYL0Hv.png (20.69 KiB) Viewed 138 times
Here are my proposed ideas on sizes, and as well, I was wondering how to handle, or if I even need to handle the entrance.

Currently, the plan is to put a 1000w in the dining room, and a 2000w in the living room, below the windows, those would be wired together from a thermostat I plan on installing at the wall next to the kitchen in the hallway.

Question is, should I put a heater at the entrance?

If so, should it be on the same circuit as the other two?

If not, heater + thermostat combo or it's own thermostat?

Other rooms:

Master: 2000w
Spare R: 1250 / 1500w
Bathroom: 500 / 750w


Curious on the input from you guys, somebody with more experience. Sizing was done using 10w/sq ft. No idea what the best approach is for the entrance. My ideal scenario would be a straight forward 500-750w heater with a built in thermostat that keeps just the entrance warm, and the only spot that won't get constantly cold due to the door, is at the hallway, next to the kitchen, where I would put the living room and dining room heaters on.

Thanks again!

Cheers


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Aaron
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Re: Baseboard heater for entrance? How many watts per room?

Post by Aaron » Tue Feb 06, 2018 7:32 pm

I think typically an entrance could have a smaller heater, maybe even an in-wall one you'd install in a bathroom. I think the calculations for wattages of each is more dependent on what the heat output capacity requirements of your space is--the BTUs necessary to heat the volume of space.

Anyone know these formulae? Because I don't.

All I can say from an electrical standpoint is that you should wire up all of them such that they can all be on, and that probably means running individual 240V circuits to each from independent double-pole breakers. My only knowledge of baseboard heaters is that they all have independent thermostats as well.

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emtnut
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Re: Baseboard heater for entrance? How many watts per room?

Post by emtnut » Wed Feb 07, 2018 4:27 am

I like Aarons idea of a small wall mount for the door. Baseboards at an entrance usually get covered with boots/jackets :o

I don't think the hallway is a good place for the living/dining t-stat. Placement should be in the vicinity of the room for proper heat control.

I personally don't like to load up heating circuits too much, so on 1 20A circuit I like to max out at about 2500-3000 watts. It gives you a bit of play if you find you need a bit more heat, you can add or upgrade without running a new circuit. Each circuit requires it's own 'properly sized' thermostat

I think the living area 'may' be a bit undersized. 10W sq ft is a general guide, but the size of the room windows, R value of insulation, whether there is heat above and/or below the room are all factors.
Here is a really good heat calculator link for you... https://www.stelpro.com/en-CA/heating-calculator

Think that covers your questions, let me know if I missed something :mrgreen:
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jeb101
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Re: Baseboard heater for entrance? How many watts per room?

Post by jeb101 » Thu Feb 08, 2018 1:18 pm

emtnut wrote:
Wed Feb 07, 2018 4:27 am
I like Aarons idea of a small wall mount for the door. Baseboards at an entrance usually get covered with boots/jackets :o

I don't think the hallway is a good place for the living/dining t-stat. Placement should be in the vicinity of the room for proper heat control.

I personally don't like to load up heating circuits too much, so on 1 20A circuit I like to max out at about 2500-3000 watts. It gives you a bit of play if you find you need a bit more heat, you can add or upgrade without running a new circuit. Each circuit requires it's own 'properly sized' thermostat

I think the living area 'may' be a bit undersized. 10W sq ft is a general guide, but the size of the room windows, R value of insulation, whether there is heat above and/or below the room are all factors.
Here is a really good heat calculator link for you... https://www.stelpro.com/en-CA/heating-calculator

Think that covers your questions, let me know if I missed something :mrgreen:
Unfortunately, I think the only thing in our budget for the moment for the entrance would be a baseboard heater for the entrance, but I do agree that a wall mounted convector would be best, the problem is wall space to mount the thermostat. Entrance the only real good spot to put it would be built into the thermostat, as you don't want your thermostat on an outside wall either.

The undersized Living/Dining room makes sense, my original plan was 1500 dining, 2000 living room. Thermostat location is definitely easiest with a single thermostat for both, which the most "central" location is definitely on the hallway, which is similar location where they had the oil furnace thermostat (I'd be putting it near the light switch vs waist level middle of the hall).

As for thermostat location, there are basically 2, non exterior walls available, the dining room wall next to the stairs (not pictured, but it's between dining room and kitchen), and in the hallway. I can set one or two thermostats that way..

Maybe having 2 thermostats is best, one in dining room, and the other, well, the other would need to be in the hallway, as basically all my walls in that area are outside walls except for a small wall that is too close to the heater.

Are you aware of remote temp sensors for thermostats? Basically, if I were to link a wireless sensor to a thermostat, I could stash it in the ceiling or something, somewhere more central, because as you said, I didn't calculate heat loss from my windows (4 years old, so I lucked out there), but the living room window is something like 90sq feet if my memory serves me right.

The wiring and technical part of this job is simple, but doing it right, and having an efficient heating solution is a whole different ballgame... haha

Cheers!

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emtnut
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Re: Baseboard heater for entrance? How many watts per room?

Post by emtnut » Fri Feb 09, 2018 1:22 pm

jeb101 wrote:
Thu Feb 08, 2018 1:18 pm

Unfortunately, I think the only thing in our budget for the moment for the entrance would be a baseboard heater for the entrance, but I do agree that a wall mounted convector would be best, the problem is wall space to mount the thermostat. Entrance the only real good spot to put it would be built into the thermostat, as you don't want your thermostat on an outside wall either.
Either style of heater can have built in thermostats, so budget will dictate !

The undersized Living/Dining room makes sense, my original plan was 1500 dining, 2000 living room. Thermostat location is definitely easiest with a single thermostat for both, which the most "central" location is definitely on the hallway, which is similar location where they had the oil furnace thermostat (I'd be putting it near the light switch vs waist level middle of the hall).
Middle of the house is a perfect location for forced air heat, because it is heating every room. In your case, I'd recommend the wall between the living room/dining (the kitchen wall). You're OK to put the 2 on one tstat, just make sure it's rated for at least 3500Watts

As for thermostat location, there are basically 2, non exterior walls available, the dining room wall next to the stairs (not pictured, but it's between dining room and kitchen), and in the hallway. I can set one or two thermostats that way..
See pic, can you mount either 1 for both or 2 separate ones there ?

Maybe having 2 thermostats is best, one in dining room, and the other, well, the other would need to be in the hallway, as basically all my walls in that area are outside walls except for a small wall that is too close to the heater.
2 separate stats are better IMO. Better control, and you can add or upsize a heater if needed.
Are you aware of remote temp sensors for thermostats? Basically, if I were to link a wireless sensor to a thermostat, I could stash it in the ceiling or something, somewhere more central, because as you said, I didn't calculate heat loss from my windows (4 years old, so I lucked out there), but the living room window is something like 90sq feet if my memory serves me right.
I'm sure there is something wireless available, I'd imagine they wouldn't be very budget friendly !!
The wiring and technical part of this job is simple, but doing it right, and having an efficient heating solution is a whole different ballgame... haha

Cheers!
Attached pic, see arrows for tstat placement.
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jeb101
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Re: Baseboard heater for entrance? How many watts per room?

Post by jeb101 » Mon Feb 12, 2018 10:59 am

emtnut, you put so much good info, and I realized I had a mistake in my plan that I put up... :(

In the kitchen the grey line is not a wall, I must of forgot to delete it, the placement of the first thermostat in the dining room works great, but unfortunately the only other spot for it would be the back wall near the kitchen / hallway like mentioned.

So Like you mentioned, having the thermostat in the living room is a great spot, and the next wall, which won't be in the way of the door / mixed climate from opening the doors, would be right at the corner I mentioned above unfortunately.. As the other walls are either in the dining room, or roughly 2ft from an exterior wall and 8-9ft from a 2kw heater.


I think for the living room heater, a digital thermostat would be better than a mechanical one, and I may put mechanical for the bedrooms for the moment, not ideal, but it's where the budget lies for the moment, the exterior drain tile is going to kick our ass come spring time. :lol:


Cheers

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