Correct Breakers for Baseboard Heaters

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RustonABC
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Joined: Fri Jan 10, 2020 6:16 pm

Correct Breakers for Baseboard Heaters

Post by RustonABC » Fri Jan 10, 2020 7:01 pm

Hi there, I am new to forums so please bear with me. My question has to do with three 240V baseboard heaters(750W, 1500W, and 2000W) and weather the breaker size is correct. The 750W is on one to a 20amp circuit, and the 1500W and 2000W are on a 30amp circuit together.

I had an electrician do the work(all I did was run the wire for him) but after reading the manual and looking on the internet I think that the breakers may be too high or I am just being paranoid/stupid. Should the 750W heater be on a 15amp breaker and the 1500W/2000W heaters be on a 20amp.

Is this the proper calculation to come up with the right breaker size.
750W/240V = 3.12A * 1.25 = 3.91A
(1500W + 2000W)/240V = 14.59A * 1.25 = 18.23A

The heaters are Dimplex Linear Convector Baseboard LC Series. I am located Canada.
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emtnut
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Re: Correct Breakers for Baseboard Heaters

Post by emtnut » Fri Jan 10, 2020 8:00 pm

RustonABC wrote:
Fri Jan 10, 2020 7:01 pm
Hi there, I am new to forums so please bear with me. My question has to do with three 240V baseboard heaters(750W, 1500W, and 2000W) and weather the breaker size is correct. The 750W is on one to a 20amp circuit, and the 1500W and 2000W are on a 30amp circuit together.

I had an electrician do the work(all I did was run the wire for him) but after reading the manual and looking on the internet I think that the breakers may be too high or I am just being paranoid/stupid. Should the 750W heater be on a 15amp breaker and the 1500W/2000W heaters be on a 20amp.

Is this the proper calculation to come up with the right breaker size.
750W/240V = 3.12A * 1.25 = 3.91A
(1500W + 2000W)/240V = 14.59A * 1.25 = 18.23A

The heaters are Dimplex Linear Convector Baseboard LC Series. I am located Canada.
Resistive heating has a separate section in Canadian code.
Basically, the breaker is only there to protect the wire. The load is known, so no overcurrent protection is required and we can load the wires to 100% capacity.

So your 750W heater is fine with a 20A breaker, as long as it is 14awg (or larger)
the 3500w(combined) are fine with a 30A breaker, if wired with 12awg (or larger). Although, if a 25A breaker is available for your panel, then it should be a 25A breaker. Code allows to go to the next larger size however, which would be a 30A .

This is a special provision for heating ... this does not apply to other general use circuits
~~ Ford Ford Ford Ford Ford Ford :mrgreen: ~~

RustonABC
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Jan 10, 2020 6:16 pm

Re: Correct Breakers for Baseboard Heaters

Post by RustonABC » Fri Jan 10, 2020 8:50 pm

Ok thank you for the detailed answer, that helps put my mind at ease. I guess I was just be paranoid and need stop reading on the internet. Both circuits are wired with 12/2(red wire). I was just concerned that heaters would never trip the breaker if something was wrong.

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emtnut
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Re: Correct Breakers for Baseboard Heaters

Post by emtnut » Sat Jan 11, 2020 5:29 pm

RustonABC wrote:
Fri Jan 10, 2020 8:50 pm
Ok thank you for the detailed answer, that helps put my mind at ease. I guess I was just be paranoid and need stop reading on the internet. Both circuits are wired with 12/2(red wire). I was just concerned that heaters would never trip the breaker if something was wrong.
I wouldn't call it paranoid. Apart from Motor circuits and heating, you never see the breaker larger than what the wire calls for (ie: #14 on 15A breaker and #12 on a 20A breaker)

Note for anyone that comes across this on google, this is a CEC provision and does not apply to NEC.
~~ Ford Ford Ford Ford Ford Ford :mrgreen: ~~

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